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Thread: What's this moss at the bottom of my vft?

  1. #17

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    Personally, I have not found it to be harmless, at least in regards to Drosera and Utricularia. Moss is also a good indicator that something isn't quite right in the mix: too high a mineral count which CP's hate. Thats where the real problems come from. I repot all my plants showing excessive moss annually just to be on the safe side. I have noticed that many Drosera species always perk up after the transplant, probably because I got rid of both the competition and minerals.

    Moss ID is impossible without a lot of expertise and a microscope, but I can say that no sphagnum I have ever seen looks at all like the moss in the photo, and we have about 8 species in our bog.
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    endparenthesis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Tamlin Dawnstar @ June 07 2004,4:42)]Personally, I have not found it to be harmless, at least in regards to Drosera and Utricularia. Moss is also a good indicator that something isn't quite right in the mix: too high a mineral count which CP's hate. Thats where the real problems come from. I repot all my plants showing excessive moss annually just to be on the safe side. I have noticed that many Drosera species always perk up after the transplant, probably because I got rid of both the competition and minerals.

    Moss ID is impossible without a lot of expertise and a microscope, but I can say that no sphagnum I have ever seen looks at all like the moss in the photo, and we have about 8 species in our bog.
    That's a good point. I bought these at Home Depot (they were just in and are in surprisingly good health... they had both Common and Dente, not that they knew the difference). The medium they're planted in appears to be entirely long fiber sphagnum. Could a high mineral count be found in such a medium? I can always replant them... but the LFS seemed to be working out as it was.

    I guess the conclusion is that this isn't sphagnum, then. Ok, now to figure out if it's worth getting rid of. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

    The moss was actually one of the reasons I bought the plant... hoping it was a good kind and I could make it spread. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

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    Somewhat Unstable superimposedhope's Avatar
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    Now that I look at it again, it kinda looks like Sellaginella or some kind of carpeting plant not moss.
    I used to collect moss but its been a while now.
    Tamlin is right, for moss to grow there must be an abundance of mineral and quite often highly acidic.

    Joe
    \"There is nothing here of interest to any nation, as a matter of fact there is nothing here but humans!\"

  4. #20

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    endparenthesis,

    LFS is a reliable medium if it hasn't been long watered with hard water (something garden centers are notorious for). If the plant is growing well, my inclination is to let it be. Even if it contradicts standard advice. There are so many considerations, it's hard to tell what variable may or may not be affecting the plants growth. My rule of thumb is if it ain't broke don't fix it, but be aware of potential problems, be observant, and act if it seems the plant is somehow declining in health.

    I have this moss as well as about 30 others. As far as being a detriment in and of itself, it is fairly well behaved: a slower growing moss. The worst is a low flat growing long moss that is impossible to eradicate even going to bare root. It always returns around the base of the rosettes, making transplants mandatory twice a year, or else the plants will be buried.

    My greatest success comes from using seasoned peat/sand that has sat in the rain for a season premixed in pots. These pots rarely get any moss growth.
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    Don't some mosses produce antibiotics like pennicillin.

    I remember my biology teacher showing us moss in a field telling us that no plants can grow around the moss soil cause it puts chemicals in the soil.

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    I don't know enough to answer with authority, but I have talked to other skilled growers who has likewise noted the appearance of these mosses also go hand in hand with decline of seedlings and some plants. It certainly is the case in my experience with Drosera seedlings. and not just due to choking. I don't know if it is a coincidence with the minerals present that support the growth, a PH relationship, or something the mosses put out. All I know is in my experience, these sort of mosses are not good news in pots of Utricularia or Drosera. Vft's seem less bothered, and my pings don't seem to react with the same negative results.
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    I have my VFT's and sundews in a 10 gallon fish-tank with a 4 or 5" top layer of long fiber sphagnum it's semi green in a few spot's. think this will negatively affect the growth of my sundews?
    (i recently washed the moss,lower layer of peat and the silica sand bottom layer)
    my ppm count on distilled watter using water wise 5000 was 1-3 ppm. i notice the moss is coming to life but the run off water of the mix is less than 30 ppm is the moss surviving off the bright light or does its return to life show a mineral problem for me?

    -Steve
    Steven S.
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  8. #24
    Steve L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (LESLIEx317537 @ July 08 2004,10:42)]Don't some mosses produce antibiotics like pennicillin.

    I remember my biology teacher showing us moss in a field telling us that no plants can grow around the moss soil cause it puts chemicals in the soil.
    The Moss in the photo that started this tread is most deffinatly not sphagnum, but a few people have already stated that.

    Pennicillin is actually a type of fungi, a mold to be more specific. Some mosses have anti bacterial properties, in fact native Americans used sphagnum as a dressing for wounds as well as a liner for baby "diapers".

    I know of no bryophytes (mosses) that produce a substance to inhibit other plant growth, in fact many times mosses are pioneer plants, meaning they are some of the first plants to establish in disturbed areas. Many higher plants produce chemicals that hinder other plant growth around them. The first ones that come to mind are Walnut trees and spotted Knap weed. Maybe your teacher was refering to a plant other then a moss?

    Steve
    Steve L
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