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Thread: Drosera collinsiae?

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    gardenofeden's Avatar
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    I've had this plant about 20 years, think I got it from Eric Green, and have always known it as collinsiae. May have been mixed up with burkeana or "sp. no. 4" over the years? Anyway, with all this expertise thought I would try and settle the ID if poss...

    flower:


    leaf:


    whole plant:
    Stephen
    Sarracenia rosea?...don't be ridiculous!

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    Hi Stephen,

    I would accept this plant without reservation as Drosera collinsiae.

    It is true that the plant was mixed up with D. burkeana, but it was long in the past and in habitat. The plant is a likely hybrid of D. burkeana and D. madagascariensis.

    In my experience it is very variable, but your photo shows a classic example of what I have come to regard as this plant.
    Restore our biosphere, create a new culture of kindness.

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    Hi,

    except for the flower, this plant does not look like the plants i'm growing as D. collinsiae. I have never had such an upright habit in my D. collinsiae. The leaf shape is also different from the plants i'm growing.

    Christian

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    Christian,

    I don't know if it counts for much (considering the South Africal variability) but I grow 3 different clones which in my opinion are D. collinsiae. 2 of the forms have an upright habit, although they are not caulescent. Both upright forms have tetrete petioles with very small marginal hairs. The third form is prostrate, and the petioles are more elliptical in cross section. The flowers of both types are identical.

    Worse yet! I have another plant, which I think is a result of uncontrolled fertilization in my collection between D. nidiformis and D. dielsiana and the flowers are very similar to D. collinsiae! I suppose it could be D. burkeana x D. nidiformis as well since both were flowering, but it could *not* have been D. burkeana x D. madagascariensis (which is the supposed parentage of D. collinsiae) since I have yet to flower D. madagascariensis! The cross looks nothing like any D. dielsiana x D. nidiformis hybrids I have seen, so what is it? 80% of me says it is a form of D. collinsiae, but how can this be possible?

    South African plants are a headache! It's like tallying up some score sheet. In this case, what is there to call the plant other than D. collinsiae? Nothing seems "pure" in South African Drosera. You just have to trust your guts, lol.

    In this particular case, the tetrete petiole speaks strongly to me of D. collinsiae, if you grant D. burkeana as a likely parent of D. collinsiae as many do. So, in my own mind, I am defining D. collinsiae now more by the nature of the cross section of the petiole. Unless the progenitor of D. collinisiae is extinct, then there is no other choice from South Africa for the parent except D. burkeana which is the only species to have tetrete petioles. Since whatever my hybrid is so closely mimics D. collinsiae, I feel the elliptical cross section must now exclude a plant from this determination.

    Of course, I have a limited experience having done no herbarium studies, so this is probably just my silly opinion, lol. I guess this will be another topic of discussion with Robert in the near future. It may well be the variation across the range of D. collinisae includes every imaginable degree of gradiation in the petiole cross section. It wouldn't surprise me in the least.
    "Grow More, Share More"

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    Hi,

    I would accept D. collinsiae as well, although this plant is different to my plants. But this has nothing to say in south-african drosera. The plants i grow as D. collinsiae 'Faryland' do not have a tetrete petiole as you can see in the picture below. I have yet to see an opened flower of these plants. My other clone looks nearly the same as the Stephens plants, except for the upright habit and a slightly different leaf shape. The flowers are identical to Stephens plants.

    What does the hybrid between Drosera collinsiae and nidiformis look like? Maybe D. nidiformis as a parent might give such a habit without changing the plants too much.

    Drosera collinsiae :


    picture in higher resolution


    picture in higher resolution


    picture in higher resolution


    picture in higher resolution

    Drosera collinsiae 'Faryland' :


    picture in higher resolution


    picture in higher resolution

    Christian

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    Christian,

    That is an excellent thought, since both D. collinsiae and D. nidiformis were in flower at the same time. It makes perfect sense. Have a cookie, I think you solved my mystery!
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    gardenofeden's Avatar
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    thanks for all the answers, I'll take them as a tentative yes![img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif[/img]
    Stephen
    Sarracenia rosea?...don't be ridiculous!

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    When it comes to the S/Af species, most of it is tentative in my opinion. Not well behaved plants at all.
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