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Thread: Unknown tree

  1. #9
    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
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    Humm... Are the leaf edges serrated?
    that makes no logic

  2. #10
    Somewhat Unstable superimposedhope's Avatar
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    Ceiba pentandra perhaps, they have small thorns that look very similar to chocalte chips in shape and are usually yellow/pink or orange. They are also called something silk tree.

    Joe
    \"There is nothing here of interest to any nation, as a matter of fact there is nothing here but humans!\"

  3. #11
    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
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    I hope its not, but i dont have any species information on that tree, but understand its a invasive species. I think its also called mimosa. If you indeed have Mimosa you should destroy the seedlings immidiatly because it can be very difficult to eradicate once established.

    The leaves to me look like they Are from the group of poplars and aspens. The seeds might be from these but im unshere. Pick a thorn. can you tear it apart with your hands (carfull not to poke urself.) Is the inside green, sticky and sweet-smelling? Poplars have flower buds that are sharp and hard like thorns.

    Beans and beenpods are from the Legume Family and these definatly have thorns but their leaves are usualy compound.

    The habitat would be usefull because the legums usually prefer it dry and the popolars like it wet.

    The California Redbud has leaves sort of similar and seed pods but no thorns. I will reaserch. introduced species
    that makes no logic

  4. #12

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    Nope, the leaves are not serated. That was just my shaky hand on the mouse. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_n_32.gif[/img] The leaves look more like the spades on a deck of cards, just without the funky bottom. Or, if you want plant comparrison, the leaves have the same shape of morning glories, but they are flat on the bottom. I tried cutting the thorn open, but it smelled like freshly cut grass, just very very weak. It was wet, but not sticky. Oh and the thorns do look like chocolate chips in shape.

  5. #13
    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
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    I dont think its mimosa

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]NATIVE RANGE: Iran to Japan (according to Hortus 3rd. ed.).

    DESCRIPTION: Silk tree, also known as mimosa, or silky acacia, is a small to medium-sized tree in the pea family (Fabaceae) that can grow up to 20-40 feet tall. The bark is light brown, nearly smooth, and generally thin with lens shaped areas along the stem. The attractive fern-like leaves of mimosa are finely divided, 5-8 inches long by about 3-4 inches wide, and alternate along the stems. Silk tree has showy and fragrant pink flowers, about 1 inches long, that resemble pom-poms and are arranged in panicles at the ends of branches. Fruits are flat, straw-colored pods about 6 inches long containing light brown oval-shaped seeds about inch in length. Pods ripen in August to September and begin to disintegrate soon after, but remain on the trees into winter.

    ECOLOGICAL THREAT: Because silk tree can grow in a variety of soils, produce large seed crops, and resprout when damaged, it is a strong competitor to native trees and shrubs in open areas or forest edges. Dense stands of mimosa severely reduce the sunlight and nutrients available for other plants.

    DISTRIBUTION IN THE UNITED STATES: Silk tree is naturalized from New Jersey to Louisiana and in California. Click here to see a distribution map.
    http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/alju1.htm
    that makes no logic

  6. #14

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    Nope, it's not mimosa. I have one in my backyard but it has no pollinator. I talked to brother last night, and he said it was IN the city, and that it is probably not native.

  7. #15
    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
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    it selfs
    that makes no logic

  8. #16

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    It does? I guess mine is still too young then.

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