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Thread: Hello from Portland, Oregon!

  1. #9
    Cthulhu138's Avatar
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    Then, I suggest you very carefully repot the plant into a more suitable mix.

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    Science nerd at large apoplast's Avatar
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    Hi Ben - Welcome to TF! I'm with Cthulhu. Very, very carefully repot it. Not because of the soil right now. As the late, great Phil Mann used to say "Tuberous Drosera would grow in a wet sock if you let them." The reason I'm suggesting repotting is that transitioning your plant into dormancy without rotting the new tuber will be much more challenging in a highly water-holding soil. It can be done, to be sure, but it sounds like you are a little new to this group of plants so there is no reason to add an extra challenge at that stage.

    You'll need to follow the stolon down to what will likely be a shriveling tuber from last summer. It is this main shoot that you do not want to snap. The lateral roots that come off the sides of this stolon are less critical. If you find the tuber is soft, or looks to be dying, that's okay. They replace their tubers every year, and it will have translocated much of its stored energy to the shoots at this time of year. Depending on how far your plant has progressed in its seasonal growth, you may find a second thick stolon descending to produce next summer's tuber. It would be best not to snap that if you find one, but it's pretty early in season for that. Mostly, I wanted to give you a heads up.

    Remember, you won't need bare root it. Even if you leave a core of the peaty soil around all of the stolon and roots, that will be fine. It will still allow the plant to dry more appropriately at the end of the season. Good luck! And if you have any other questions, please just ask. I love this group of plants, and I'm always willing to help out folks who are trying to grow them.

  3. #11
    Benurmanii's Avatar
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    Hmm, repotting always makes me nervous, I have only done it once before and it was a pot of crowded D. capensis and I did a pretty messy job of it. Would I be fine if I just repotted the tuber into a better mix once the plant dies back at the beginning of dormancy instead of repotting it now?

  4. #12
    Cthulhu138's Avatar
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    The problem is getting it into dormancy successfully in it's current media. It will need a repot before it starts going dormant. I've found it easier to use dry media when repotting actively growing tuberous Drosera. The dry sandy mix, when added slowly by hand easily fills in all the gaps around the roots, much better than trying to pack moist media in around them and possibly damaging the stolon. The media can then be moistened, keeping the roots and stolon safe.

  5. #13
    Benurmanii's Avatar
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    Alright, so do they have natural clocks that tell them to start dormancy, or is it mostly triggered by the drying out of the soil around them during summer? It seems like they have environmental queues from what you are telling me.

    Either way I'll make sure to repot it carefully. I love tuberous Drosera and I would like to keep this one alive!

  6. #14
    Cthulhu138's Avatar
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    They do have an internal clock of sorts but dormancy will be triggered by a raise in temperature and photoperiod simultaneously. Once you notice your plant dying back (anywhere from March to May), stop watering it and let the pot dry out.

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    Benurmanii's Avatar
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    So I went looking for some silica sand at a local nursery, but I couldn't find any. I do have some sand labeled "horticultural sand", which isn't silica and looks more like river sand. Would it be ok to use this sand if I washed it thoroughly? Or do they prefer something that is more naturally inert?

  8. #16
    Cthulhu138's Avatar
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    "Horticultural sand" is more often than not silica sand. The best places to find good quality silica sand is swimming pool supply stores. It is the sand used in filters.

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