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Thread: Passiflora (Passionflower, Passionfruit) Thread

  1. #17

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    John, the P. 'Sunburst' in the first photo (upper left, egg mimicry obvious even in that view) also looks good.

    P. sanguinolenta is a great plant because it's so easy to propagate and does well under so many conditions. It's one I grow in spite of the fact that it is not that good of a bloomer for me (due to lack of sun). It did pretty well last summer, though. The flowers are not big and flashy like some Passifloras, but they are simple and elegant.

    Here's a trick to get capsules. In this species and some related plants, they form fruits that are not what one thinks of regarding Passifloras, but capsules that split open when ripe to expose the seeds. I understand that if one applies the pollen of the appropriate species, the exogenous pollen causes P. sanguinolenta to self-pollinate. I have not tried this personally, but a friend did, and reported success. He then lost the capsules in the freeze of December 2013. The species that I've heard used for this is Passiflora caerulea, although I would imagine others might also work. In general those with very "potent" pollen are probably the best bets. P. loefgrenii might be another to try for that reason. Both of those are from a different subgenus within Passiflora. The have a different number of chromosomes, so if a fruit/capsule is formed it would be the result of selfing.

    Here are some pieces of my plant which shows the diversity in size, shape and patterning of the leaves, all on one plant, and all within several feet of one another. My "big" plant is still in a 1 gallon pot. The scale is inches.


  2. #18

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    Here are some more leaves. I was out looking at my plants this evening, and I noticed a lot of them had unusually large leaves. So I starting picking leaves...

    You can get some idea of the diversity of leaf shape and sizes here. I really don't grow any of those with truly ornamental leaves (P. boenderi, P. trifasciata, etc.)



    They are:

    1) Passiflora 'Preciosa' (P. macrocarpa 'Blue Moon' x P. alata)
    2) Passiflora sanguinolenta (again)
    3) Passiflora bogotensis
    4) Passiflora 'Sunburst'
    5) Passiflora 'Mission Dolores' (P. parritae x P. antioquiensis)
    6) Passiflora membranacea, variegated, young plant
    7) Passiflora membranacea "Strybing Clone" (underside shown)
    8) Passiflora tarminiana Alba 'Bailadores'
    9) Passiflora loefgrenii 'Iporanga'
    10) Passiflora Oaklandia (a P. manicata hybrid, perhaps with P. tarminiana. Not a P. parritae hybrid, as claimed)

    2,3,4,6 and 7 are Decalobas (a subgenus within Passiflora)
    5,8 and 10 are Tacsonias, a group of Andean Passifloras that used to be a separate genus. Now a Supersection within the same subgenus as P. caerulea, etc.

    Notice the egg mimicry in 3 (may be difficult to see) and 4. The idea is that a butterfly will see the white spots on the leaves, think eggs have already been laid, and pass up the leaf for a different one.

    Some of these leaves are at or past the typical upper size limit for the species. Probaby the combination of a lot of shade and other conditions favored large leaf growth.

  3. #19
    Chief Cat Behavior Specialist Knuckles's Avatar
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    That is truly amazing the variety of leaves & all from passiflora plants.

  4. #20
    BS Bulldozer SubRosa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RandyS View Post
    John, the P. 'Sunburst' in the first photo (upper left, egg mimicry obvious even in that view) also looks good.

    P. sanguinolenta is a great plant because it's so easy to propagate and does well under so many conditions. It's one I grow in spite of the fact that it is not that good of a bloomer for me (due to lack of sun). It did pretty well last summer, though. The flowers are not big and flashy like some Passifloras, but they are simple and elegant.

    Here's a trick to get capsules. In this species and some related plants, they form fruits that are not what one thinks of regarding Passifloras, but capsules that split open when ripe to expose the seeds. I understand that if one applies the pollen of the appropriate species, the exogenous pollen causes P. sanguinolenta to self-pollinate. I have not tried this personally, but a friend did, and reported success. He then lost the capsules in the freeze of December 2013. The species that I've heard used for this is Passiflora caerulea, although I would imagine others might also work. In general those with very "potent" pollen are probably the best bets. P. loefgrenii might be another to try for that reason. Both of those are from a different subgenus within Passiflora. The have a different number of chromosomes, so if a fruit/capsule is formed it would be the result of selfing.

    Here are some pieces of my plant which shows the diversity in size, shape and patterning of the leaves, all on one plant, and all within several feet of one another. My "big" plant is still in a 1 gallon pot. The scale is inches.

    Thanks again Randy! If you recall it was the 'Sunburst' that initially drew my interest, so I'm very pleased at its progress. Even though it hasn't flowered, it's grown the most by far of any of the plants I got from you. The loefgrenii cutting didn't make it, but all the others are thriving. The 'Sunburst' has put on easily twice the biomass of the sanguinolenta, and is even outgrowing the foetida which was potted and growing when I started rooting the cuttings. Is the 'Sunburst' likely to bloom this season? Also do you think that the pollen of incarnata could trigger the sanguinolenta to set seed? Thanks again for introducing me to these beautiful plants!
    Judge not lest ye be judged creates a cesspool. Judge others and prepare to be judged by them.
    Just know when to keep the verdict to yourself.

  5. #21

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    I think 'Sunburst' will probably bloom the first season if it's growing vigorously. A friend of mine in Maryland tells me that it is the biggest monster of her Passifloras outside in the summer--and she grows a lot of plants. Proably It would behave similarly in your similar climate. I don't think it's nearly as strong of a grower out here, or at least it never has been for me.

    I don't know if P. incarnata pollen would stimulate selfing of P. sanguinolenta, but it's certainly worth a try.

  6. #22
    BS Bulldozer SubRosa's Avatar
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    Well I wouldn't argue with the monster moniker on the plant, it really is a grower! I'm really looking forward to seeing it bloom.
    Judge not lest ye be judged creates a cesspool. Judge others and prepare to be judged by them.
    Just know when to keep the verdict to yourself.

  7. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by SubRosa View Post
    So you think that money is the root of all evil? Have you ever asked "what is the root of money"?
    This has only a little to do with Passifloras, but I thought I'd answer the question. As of today, it's apparently Ebay. From my page on Ebay:


  8. #24
    hcarlton's Avatar
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    Interestingly the number 666 actually represents man, not evil....so your eBay page is rather accurate depicting realilty.
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
    There is far more to everything than meets the eye.
    Growlist

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