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Thread: Passiflora (Passionflower, Passionfruit) Thread

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    Passiflora (Passionflower, Passionfruit) Thread

    I noticed that there was a Passiflora thread on Terraforums, but many years ago. I thought it was time to start a new one.

    Although pictures of flowers can be flashy, I want to encourage people to post picture, comments, questions about whatever... Fruits, leaves (some species are grown primarily for foliage, not flowers), propagation, wild species, questions of carnivory (Dysosmias) and so on. Whatever seems interesting.

    I figured I'd start with my most reliable Passiflora, which means that it does well in spite of the shade in my tiny growing area: Passiflora loefgrenii. Right now I grow two varieties: 'Iporanga' (both in a pot and in the ground) and Corupa (a new plant in a pot). I have an extra 'Iporanga' in a pot that's too big to easily ship, for anyone who lives in my area (SF Peninsula, San Mateo County). A free plant.

    The first photo is actually in my old location, about 20 miles South of where I am now. Passiflora loefgrenii 'Iporanga':



    In addition to it's contrasting day-glow colors and appearance as if it were drawn by Dr. Seuss, one thing I really like about P. loefgrenii 'Iporanga' is its long peduncles. I've seen them over a foot--in fact just today on one of my plants. This photo illustrates the effect:



    Another nice feature about Passiflora loefgrenii is that it blooms small. Here are rooted cuttings for sale in a local nursery (wholesaler Annie's Annuals) showing buds on a small plant:



    One thing that the 'Iporanga' clone does not do is make fruit easily. I'm told that even with an appropriate pollen source, it's difficult to get this variety to make fruit. It does, however, provide potent pollen as a male parent when making hybrids.

    The other Passiflora loefgrenii variety that one frequently encounters is 'Corupa', which is not only self-fertile, but seems to make fruit off of most of it's flowers. I finally got a nice plant of 'Corupa' recently, which a friend bought at the UCBG Spring Sale. I don't have a picture of the flowers, right now, but their colors are less shocking, more pastel shades. The flowers are slightly smaller, and the peduncles are shorter on average. Here's my new plant, in fruit:



    And finally, here's part of my "extra" plant showing buds and long peduncles. I was assured by a nursery that this was the variety that gets fruit... Even without blooming it, it's clear by the length of the peduncles that it is P. loefgrenii 'Iporanga'. Again, this plant is available, locally.



    The fruit is sometimes billed as the "Garlic Passionfruit", as if this is a good thing, and a taste treat. Everyone I've heard from tells me the fruit tastes vile. I like this species a lot, however, and would love to be able to reproduce it from seeds.

    I'll add more species and hybrids to this thread, and hopefully others will as well.

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    hcarlton's Avatar
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    Wish my cutting had managed to take root.....lovely flowers!
    As soon as I'm done on my rounds this week I'll get pics of the P. pinnatistipula seedlings, as well as my P. coccinea plant that is waking up with the warm weather again (and needs a new pot ).
    Everything has a reason, whether big or small. Never underestimate the power of what is or is not.
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    NECPS Editor Radagast's Avatar
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    So funny you should post this today. I just recently purchased one of these from a nursery and it is still in the pot. The plant is probably about a foot long so far. I bought a trellis for it and am hoping to plant it in the ground. It says they are hardy to zone 4 (I'm zone 5). Any suggestions for planting & care while it adjusts to being transplanted?

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    BS Bulldozer SubRosa's Avatar
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    Really amazing plants! I lost the loefgrenii you sent, but the other 3 are doing very well. I should have a bloom on the sanguinolenta in the next couple days.
    Judge not lest ye be judged creates a cesspool. Judge others and prepare to be judged by them.
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    Hawken and John,

    I've found P. loefgrenii to often be difficult from cuttings. They tend to drop all the leaves, and then sulk (or die). Sometimes it's easy--I suspect this is partly a seasonal phenomenon, but I don't know what season is best. Right now, every new shoot has beautiful buds on long peduncles. It's kind of hard to sacrifice those for cuttings. As things warm up, the plant stops blooming for the summer--even here. I'm really hoping for lots of seeds from the 'Corupa' strain, to bypass vegetative propagation of this species. P. loefgrenii 'Corupa' is also nice, and some people would probably prefer it to 'Iporanga'.

    P. sanguinolenta, on the other hand, is such a nice and easy and underrated species. The flowers are not huge, they're not flashy, but they are elegant. If you hit a flower of P. sanguinolenta with P. caerulea pollen (and I'm sure other species/hybrids work) it stimulates the normally self-sterile flower to self-pollinate. It then forms a capsule, rather than a fruit, which when mature splits open to reveal the seeds. I have not done this myself. I don't grow P. caerulea, but there's an old monster in our downtown, and I need to try this.

    Radagast, the only species I've heard of which is OK to zone 5 is P. lutea, along with some Northern strains of P. incarnata. Zone 4 sounds like it's pushing it. P. incarnata is only sometimes hardy below zone 7 or so--one really needs to find the right strain. Strains from Florida are not hardy to that much cold. If you did buy P. incarnata, I've heard once it's established it can be a bit weedy. It's a species not commonly grown in California, because there's not much appeal for a plant which is dormant half the year and spreads aggressively through the roots. If it is one of the hardy stains, you are still right on the edge of it's range. So planting it next to a house, where it gets extra warmth, heavily mulching, etc. is important. Whatever tricks people do to keep plants alive through winter--not exactly something I have experience with. I think it also prefers to be not cold and wet at the same time. I expect it's pretty easy through the warmer months, with full sun and plenty of water.

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    A couple small-flowered Decaloba hybrids: P. 'Manta' and P. 'Sunburst'. Decaloba is a subgenus within the genus Passilora.

    Both of these can bloom as small plants; P. 'Manta always stays small, but 'Sunburst' can get huge under favorable conditions.

    Here is 'Manta' in bloom. Manta is P. xiikzodz x P. coriacea. That strain of P. coriacea is now called P. sexocellata. These are known as "batwing" Passiforas, with (often) attractive, large, mottled leaves. "xiikzodz" means "batwing" in the Mayan language (whose name I forget). Zodz was their bat god.



    This is an old photo; 'Manta' has never done well for me long term. I suspect like many other Decaloba Passifloras from low elevation it prefers a warmer climate. I've had a 'Manta' rooted cutting outside for the last year or so--it is tiny, with 2 leaves.

    Here is 'Sunburst', a Patrick Worley hybrid, P. gilbertiana x P. jorullensis.



    A blooming plant in a 4 inch pot:



    And some leaves today, at about eye level. Note the spots on the leaves. These are egg mimicry, to try to fool butterflies into thinking that another butterfly has already laid eggs on the leaves. Pretty clever.


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    Another spectacular Passiflora, which I have as a small plant is Passiflora parritae. This blooms as a large plant, and requires a cool (nearly) frost-free climate, such as San Francisco. It's in the group (now called a Supersection) Tacsonia. Tacsonias, Andean Passifloras adapted to live at high elevation and specialized for hummingbird pollination, used to be considered their own genus.

    Here's the big plant at the SF Botanical Garden a couple summers ago. It was it's best bloom ever, then it got seriously damaged by that winter's freeze (27 F or less, 3 days in December 2013).



    I've read that the species is in danger in the wild because it's numbers have been depleted as an indirect consequence of global warming. Apparently it's sole pollinator is the hummingbird Ensifera ensifera, and with warmer temperatures the bird has moved to higher elevations than P. parritae grows at. If you look carefully at the the flowers in the photo above you'll see why a unique hummingbird such as Ensifera ensifera is needed for pollination. The flowers are huge, by the way.

    Here's what Ensifera ensifera looks like, courtesy of Wikimedia commons:

    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons" href="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3ASword-billed_Hummingbird_-_Ecuador_S4E4619.jpg">Sword-billed Hummingbird - Ecuador S4E4619

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    This is a extremely popular variety grown in Australia, its easy to grow and is a great fruit barer.

    http://www.nelliekelly.com.au/about-us.html


    The Nellie Kelly Passion fruit flower

    Terrascape
    Last edited by Terrascape; 05-12-2015 at 11:16 PM.
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