User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 6 of 8 FirstFirst ... 2345678 LastLast
Results 41 to 48 of 57

Thread: Is this rope strangling our tree?

  1. #41
    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    3,472
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Heres why. Yes if the rope simply crosses part of the tree (with fences, other trees and such), the intact portion of the tree will speed up the transportation of nutrients and oxygen to compinsate for the loss of vacular tissue. However, if the rope encercles the whole tree, there is now no way for it to get food and nutrients from its roots, and will starve/choke/suffecate.

    Want to know what that would be like? Put a rope around your neck and pull very tightly. Thats what happens to abused puppies that come in to our animal shelter sometimes, the owner is so inattentive that the collar become inbedded in the animals neck as it grows. skin grows around it, but it will sever the blood vessles and choke it eventually. It looks 'healed' on the outside, but its wreking havoc on the inside... the parts you CANT see.

    Hum i certainlt dont see anything on stupid trees or growth patterns.... do you? kindly show me where because i dont see it.


    The point of my last post was to reply to what ALLOSAURZ said at the post at the topof page4

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]ALLOSAURZ


    Joined: Dec. 2003 Posted: Sep. 06 2004,11:39

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    BUt the problem with that rationale though is that trees aren't nearly as complex as we are. I fyou cut our arm off we won't grow 10 new ones.

    He is saying that trees are stupid, not i. You should you should read all the posts through thouroghly before clicking "add reply", spec.


    ALLOSAURZ , that fence is clearly not encircling the tree in ringlike structure.

    encircling; to wrap completely around.

    Cheers,
    Finch
    that makes no logic

  2. #42

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Posts
    389
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Want me to show another pic to prove that it is circling the tree? It is. Also I never said trees were stupid. I said they were less complex which is true. A worm would you agree is less complex then we are correct? If you cut off a piece of a worm it will grow that section back no? A human though is more complex. If you cut off a humans are it won't grow back because the nerves, circulatory system, bone, muscle, skin etc is far more complex then the wood of a tree. But anyways at one point in that trees life it was being girdled by the fence till it grew over it and absorbed it

  3. #43

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Central Coast of California
    Posts
    3,928
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Finch @ Sep. 07 2004,6:47)]
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Heres why. Yes if the rope simply crosses part of the tree (with fences, other trees and such), the intact portion of the tree will speed up the transportation of nutrients and oxygen to compinsate for the loss of vacular tissue. However, if the rope encercles the whole tree, there is now no way for it to get food and nutrients from its roots, and will starve/choke/suffecate.

    Want to know what that would be like? Put a rope around your neck and pull very tightly. Thats what happens to abused puppies that come in to our animal shelter sometimes, the owner is so inattentive that the collar become inbedded in the animals neck as it grows. skin grows around it, but it will sever the blood vessles and choke it eventually. It looks 'healed' on the outside, but its wreking havoc on the inside... the parts you CANT see.

    Hum i certainlt dont see anything on stupid trees or growth patterns.... do you? kindly show me where because i dont see it.


    The point of my last post was to reply to what ALLOSAURZ said at the post at the topof page4

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]ALLOSAURZ


    Joined: Dec. 2003 Posted: Sep. 06 2004,11:39

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    BUt the problem with that rationale though is that trees aren't nearly as complex as we are. I fyou cut our arm off we won't grow 10 new ones.

    He is saying that trees are stupid, not i. You should you should read all the posts through thouroghly before clicking "add reply", spec.


    ALLOSAURZ , that fence is clearly not encircling the tree in ringlike structure.

    encircling; to wrap completely around.

    Cheers,
    Finch
    It's written all over that post boy...

    Now, stop pointin fingers at other people to try to change the subject... OF COURSE trees dont have brains and can think through problems... Thats all he's saying. In your post you're pretty much saying they arent even aware!

    You know where, and you know what I mean too. Don't give me that "Point out the exact sentence where i said 'trees are stupid' ok?" stuff....

    Finch, take a look at a tree stump. Notice how the rings can vary in size. They CAN regulate what side grows the most... Notice how on a few rings one side is just a few mm wide and on the other side is nearly 5 times the size. They can grow AROUND obstacles like ropes without a problem.

    Now, these posts really anger me. Lots of contradictions, and "Kiddy" arguments.

    "You should read before clicking reply"

    "NO, YOU should!"

    "no... YOU!"

    Saying exactly what others say and doing that girly "bounces off me sticks to you" thing...

    That kind of stuff is for kids along with contradictions and putting words in our mouth, so lets try to make this conversaion more mature, yea or nay?

    When that tree was only a few years old, and the whole stump would have fit through one fence hole, yes it could have easily surrounded the whole thing, and "choked" it like you said it would... Does that tree look like it died 10 years ago? Nope! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

    Now, I am going to use my sisters cheapy camera to take a picture of my tree sometime this week. Then you'll know what I mean, for sure [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

    Have a nice day,

    -Spec

  4. #44

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Posts
    389
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    OK here it is 100% undeniable proof that girdling a tree won't kill it. Unless you back up your argument with photos or an excerpt from a famous horticulturalist/botanist/tree person's writing I win. Check Mate kthxbye. This debate has gone on far enough it's time to end it. I don't think the author is even checking this thread anymore anyways. So here it is

  5. #45
    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    3,472
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If girdling did not kill trees it would not be in every dictonary ever written. Look here A whole list of dictionary definitions of girdlingThats your proof. Dont go on with that imature 'i win' phrase, because obviously nether of you dont know anything about trees at all. Do you have a 60$ book that you have bought with your own cash on Native trees for reading because your interested? probably not. When you go to a forest, do you bring a tree guide because you are interested to know what kind of trees grow in that area, like i do? i dont think so, buddy.


    Spec i obviously did not know what you were talking about with the 'trees are stupid' rant, and i i asked you. And then you go and have a fit with your little 'You know what, and you know what I mean too." If i had known i wouldt have been asking now, would i?!?!?!?


    And yes i will admit that my reply was imature and inappropriate. Are you happy now, or are you going to flame me for this response too?

    Bacck to the subject on girdling, lets see what 'Native trees of noth america' says on the subject
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Never girdle the base trunk of the entire tree. If you girdle a major branch segment from the main trunk it will increse seed and flower production. If you girdle the entire tree you run the risk of killing it by starving the roots of nutrients, provided by the photosynthesis occurring in the canopy of the tree
    Hum lets see what a a garden expert says on the subject at plantanswers.com...

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]may seem extreme to call a condition where a tree kills itself suicide, and yet trees are able to cause their own death. This comes about by a condition know as girdling. This self-strangulation occurs when a tree root develops so that it encircles the base of the trunk, usually just below the soil surface.

    Although girdling roots may occur naturally, the condition often develops when plants have been growing in pots long enough to develop a few roots that circle the containers. If these encircling roots are not cut at planting time, they sometimes can constrict the trunk as both the root and trunk enlarge, pressing against each other.

    This pressure from the girdling root on the trunk cuts off food and water movement that can seriously weaken and perhaps kill the tree. Where a girdling root exists, there is often a lack of enlargement at the point where the base of the trunk enters the ground as well a poor top growth.

    If a girdling root is suspected, the soil should be carefully removed from around the base of the trunk for closer inspection. If a girdling root is found, cut it away as much as possible and take care not to damage the main trunk. Then replace the soil.

    Plants are not only capable of strangling themselves, but some can actually strangle other plants. Vigorous twining vines that are growing up a tree may encircle the main trunk or branches and gradually kill them. Wisteria, bittersweet and trumpet vine are capable of causing this type of damage if they are allowed to grow on trees.


    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]plant murders by people are much more common. Wires for clotheslines, hanging plant labels, or other supports do not expand as a tree grows and eventually the wire girdles it. At times, the trunk swells, covers the wires and heals back so the tree survives. The trunk is usually weakened at the point. Even heavy rope, especially rope made from nylon, can also girdle trees if left too long.

    Tree girdling can also occur when a dog chain is looped around the base of a tree. As the dog moves and pulls on the leash, the chain can gradually saw through the bark of the tree, causing damage and eventual death.

    In addition to conditions that girdle trees, much damage is also done to tree trunks by bruising. Perhaps the most severe damage is done to young trees that have relatively thin, soft bark, although it is also undesirable to bump mature trees.

    A bump may seem light, and perhaps no visible damage is done. However, the tissue can be killed in such bruised areas. The bark then dies and becomes loose. This allows certain disease-causing fungi to invade and begin growing. If conditions are right, they may continue to grow unnoticed beneath the bark and gradually weaken or kill the tree. Dead cankers may develop as depressed, perhaps slightly darkened spots on the trunk.

    What is tree decline? Decline is a term used to describe a tree that is generally deteriorating. This deterioration may be the result of many things. The symptoms often occur because the translocation system of the tree has become disrupted. The root system may be restricted or damaged. The trunk tissues may be blocked, wounded, or infected by some agent. Decline also results when a tree's food reserves are depleted


    Atleast i am mature enough to admit my mistakes

    cheers, finch
    that makes no logic

  6. #46

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Central Coast of California
    Posts
    3,928
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks, thats all I wanted from you, not a rant [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

    Theres another contradiction. "I'm more mature than you" Statements like that, are, ironicly, immature. I'm not bothered by it though.

    What I am bothered by is that you're suggesting I'm too poor to buy a decent book on trees, and that, according to you, makes me a moron, and you a smart alic. Is that what you are suggesting? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/confused.gif[/img] And FOR YOUR INFORMATION, I do have a few books on trees, thank you.

    Now, let me fill in one blank spot i see here... Girdling a tree doesnt ALWAYS kill a tree, nor does it NEVER kill a tree.

    Would you be kind and "mature" enough to admit the rest of our mistakes?

    Boy I could "Girdle" you right now [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_m_32.gif[/img] [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/laugh.gif[/img]

    Good day [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_r_32.gif[/img]

    -Spec

  7. #47

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Central Coast of California
    Posts
    3,928
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    One more thing: Those pics are of girdled trees. Pretty interesting that they are ALIVE, eh?

  8. #48

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Posts
    389
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Finch @ Sep. 07 2004,2:23)]If girdling did not kill trees it would not be in every dictonary ever written. Look here A whole list of dictionary definitions of girdlingThats your proof. Dont go on with that imature 'i win' phrase, because obviously nether of you dont know anything about trees at all. Do you have a 60$ book that you have bought with your own cash on Native trees for reading because your interested? probably not. When you go to a forest, do you bring a tree guide because you are interested to know what kind of trees grow in that area, like i do? i dont think so, buddy.


    Spec i obviously did not know what you were talking about with the 'trees are stupid' rant, and i i asked you. And then you go and have a fit with your little 'You know what, and you know what I mean too." If i had known i wouldt have been asking now, would i?!?!?!?


    And yes i will admit that my reply was imature and inappropriate. Are you happy now, or are you going to flame me for this response too?

    Bacck to the subject on girdling, lets see what 'Native trees of noth america' says on the subject
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Never girdle the base trunk of the entire tree. If you girdle a major branch segment from the main trunk it will increse seed and flower production. If you girdle the entire tree you run the risk of killing it by starving the roots of nutrients, provided by the photosynthesis occurring in the canopy of the tree
    Hum lets see what a a garden expert says on the subject at plantanswers.com...

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]may seem extreme to call a condition where a tree kills itself suicide, and yet trees are able to cause their own death. This comes about by a condition know as girdling. This self-strangulation occurs when a tree root develops so that it encircles the base of the trunk, usually just below the soil surface.

    Although girdling roots may occur naturally, the condition often develops when plants have been growing in pots long enough to develop a few roots that circle the containers. If these encircling roots are not cut at planting time, they sometimes can constrict the trunk as both the root and trunk enlarge, pressing against each other.

    This pressure from the girdling root on the trunk cuts off food and water movement that can seriously weaken and perhaps kill the tree. Where a girdling root exists, there is often a lack of enlargement at the point where the base of the trunk enters the ground as well a poor top growth.

    If a girdling root is suspected, the soil should be carefully removed from around the base of the trunk for closer inspection. If a girdling root is found, cut it away as much as possible and take care not to damage the main trunk. Then replace the soil.

    Plants are not only capable of strangling themselves, but some can actually strangle other plants. Vigorous twining vines that are growing up a tree may encircle the main trunk or branches and gradually kill them. Wisteria, bittersweet and trumpet vine are capable of causing this type of damage if they are allowed to grow on trees.


    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]plant murders by people are much more common. Wires for clotheslines, hanging plant labels, or other supports do not expand as a tree grows and eventually the wire girdles it. At times, the trunk swells, covers the wires and heals back so the tree survives. The trunk is usually weakened at the point. Even heavy rope, especially rope made from nylon, can also girdle trees if left too long.

    Tree girdling can also occur when a dog chain is looped around the base of a tree. As the dog moves and pulls on the leash, the chain can gradually saw through the bark of the tree, causing damage and eventual death.

    In addition to conditions that girdle trees, much damage is also done to tree trunks by bruising. Perhaps the most severe damage is done to young trees that have relatively thin, soft bark, although it is also undesirable to bump mature trees.

    A bump may seem light, and perhaps no visible damage is done. However, the tissue can be killed in such bruised areas. The bark then dies and becomes loose. This allows certain disease-causing fungi to invade and begin growing. If conditions are right, they may continue to grow unnoticed beneath the bark and gradually weaken or kill the tree. Dead cankers may develop as depressed, perhaps slightly darkened spots on the trunk.

    What is tree decline? Decline is a term used to describe a tree that is generally deteriorating. This deterioration may be the result of many things. The symptoms often occur because the translocation system of the tree has become disrupted. The root system may be restricted or damaged. The trunk tissues may be blocked, wounded, or infected by some agent. Decline also results when a tree's food reserves are depleted


    Atleast i am mature enough to admit my mistakes

    cheers, finch
    See that would be all that we wanted was simple proof. I'm still not totally convinced that every tree that is girdled will die as it depends on the tree. Therefore in some cases trees do die and in other cases though they don't. But thanks for the additional info anyways.

Page 6 of 8 FirstFirst ... 2345678 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •