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Thread: Banana tree overwintering

  1. #9
    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
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    U probably see southern catalpa

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Where is a good place to get a start of these two?
    Um im not certain what you mean. The good news is both plants u r interested in grow in your stae

    Pawpaw
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Origin: The pawpaw is native to the temperate woodlands of the eastern U.S. The American Indian is credited with spreading the pawpaw across the eastern U.S. to eastern Kansas and Texas, and from the Great Lakes almost to the Gulf. Fossils prove the pawpaw is indigenous to the U.S. Banana tree overwintering
    Adaptation: The pawpaw is adapted to the humid continental climate of its native habitat. It is seldom found near the Atlantic or Gulf coasts. It requires a minimum of 400 hours of winter chill and at least 160 frost-free days. Pawpaws appear to be sensitive to low humidities, dry winds and cool maritime summers. It has been successfully grown in parts of California and the Pacific Northwest that meet its growing requirements. It has grown well in the San Jose area (USDA Climate Zone 9 or Sunset Climate Zone 15). The climatic conditions of Southern California make growing the pawpaw there more difficult. The deep winter dormancy of the tree makes it highly frost tolerant, withstanding temperatures of -25 F or lower (hardy to USDA Climate Zone 5). Pawpaws can be grown as container specimens, although this is not often practiced. A deep pot is needed to accommodate the root system.

    DESCRIPTIONGrowth Habit: The pawpaw is a deciduous, often narrowly conical tree growing from about 12 feet to around 20 feet. Pawpaw trees are prone to producing root suckers a few feet from the trunk. When these are permitted to grow, the single-clone pawpaw patch comes into being. The prevailing experiences of many individuals is that the pawpaw is a slow grower, particularly when it is young. However, under optimal greenhouse conditions, including photo-period extension light of approximately 16 hours, top growth of up to 5 feet can be attained in three months.
    Foliage: The dark green, obovate-oblong, drooping leaves grow up to 12 inches long, giving the pawpaw an interesting tropical appearance. The leaves turn yellow and begin to fall in mid-autumn and leaf out again in late spring after the tree has bloomed.

    Flowers: Dormant, velvety, dark brown flower buds develop in the axils of the previous years' leaves. They produce maroon, upside-down flowers up to 2 inches across. The normal bloom period consists of about 6 weeks during March to May depending on variety, latitude and climatic conditions. The blossom consists of 2 whorls of 3 petals each, and the calyx has 3 sepals. Each flower contains several ovaries which explains why a single flower can produce multiple fruits. Pawpaw flowers are perfect, in that they have both male and female reproduction parts, but they are not self-pollinating. The flowers are also protogynaus, i.e., the female stigma matures and is no longer receptive when the male pollen is shed. In addition pawpaws are self-incompatible, requiring cross pollination from another unrelated pawpaw tree.

    Bees show no interest in pawpaw flowers. The task of pollenization is left to unenthusiastic species of flies and beetles

    Fruit: The pawpaw is the largest edible fruit native to America. Individual fruits weigh 5 to 16 ounces and are 3 to 6 inches in length. The larger sizes will appear plump, similar to the mango. The fruit usually has 10 to 14 seeds in two rows. The brownish to blackish seeds are shaped like lima beans, with a length of 1/2 to 1-1/2 inches. Pawpaw fruits often occur as clusters of up to nine individual fruits. The ripe fruit is soft and thin skinned. And tastes like bananna
    Pollination: Poor pollination has always plagued the pawpaw in nature, and the problem has followed them into
    domestication.

    \
    Corkwood is little knwon in cultivation. It needs less water than its natural habitat indicates, suggesting it is restricted to wetlands only because of special germination requierments. It needs only reasonable moisture.
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Florida Corkwood -Leitneria floridana Chapm.

    This clonal shrub has the lightest wood of any North American plant. The leaves are dark and glossy green above, slightly hairy below, and the fruit is a one-seeded drupe. Alone in its family, there are no plants closely related to Florida corkwood. It is known from Georgia, Florida, Arkansas, Missouri, and Texas. The only population currrently known in Georgia is in Glynn County near the Altamaha River.

    Propagation Notes:
    Seed - it germinates better if given 3 months cold stratification so is probably best sown in the autumn in a cold frame. The seed can also be sown in late winter in a greenhouse but the germination is variable[78]. small out the seedlings into individual pots as soon as they are large enough to handle. Young plants should be overwintered in a greenhouse for their first year and then be planted out in late spring after the last expected frosts[78]. Give some winter protection for their first year outdoors. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in a frame[113]. Division of suckers in the dormant season[113, 200].
    that makes no logic

  2. #10
    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
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    Now my previous posts were on leaves. let me talk about the growth forms. Pawpaw looks like avacodo and at a distance can be mistaken for one.

    Crokwood is unusual in... well its hard to describe so ill use someone els's descriptian

    "Corkwood leaves emerge leathery and wolly in spring, with rugose surfaces, and eventually reach almost 6 inches in leingh and almost half as wide. they are the primary asthetic attracion of the species and, atop its colonial single-stemmed clumps, looks like it must belong to some exotic, evergreen tropicle tree. But corkwood is fully at home in our temperate climate and fully, if tardily, deciduous"

    But perhaps the best tropical-looking form (its leaves arnt anything unusual)
    Is the Arazona Sycamore, adapted to grow along desert streamms in the southwest. It will grow in your area. This huge tree looks like it belongs in a tomb-raider film with its sparce crown and huge, thick and winding python-like limbs and light gray bark. The greatest tree is 114 feet tall and a 7-foot thick trunk below its first fork. Not commonly seen in cultivation it can be grown at least as far as USDA zone 7, and perhaps 6
    that makes no logic

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    I guess I should have said "Where is a good place to purchase these plants." I see pawpaws on eBay. Is a google for sources of Leitneria floridana the best way? Based on leaf size, we have two Catalpa here, I think speciosa and bignonioides.

  4. #12
    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
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    I suggest u get ur plant sorces from local native plant societys, because they usually propigate specimens regionally adapted to your climate. U wont suceed likely with a pawpaw from tenesee or a corkwood from florida. the ones found in ur area are reagionally adapted to it
    that makes no logic

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    I just had a conversation with a grower who sells hardy bananas in Illinois. He cuts his down to a three foot stump, mulches with straw and wraps it in foam sheeting then plastic. It comes back every year in zone 5!

    Glenn

  6. #14
    Somewhat Unstable superimposedhope's Avatar
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    I grow banana outside here in NE (zone 5b) and Glenn hit it right on the head. I cut mine back to a 3' stump and then wrap in burlap, then dead leaves, then burlap again.

    Joe
    \"There is nothing here of interest to any nation, as a matter of fact there is nothing here but humans!\"

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    Hey Joe,
    Does it grow from the stump the next year? If not, why cut it so high off the ground? Or, does the stump just act as the anchor to tie the insulation to and the new growth comes from the ground?

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    Somewhat Unstable superimposedhope's Avatar
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    Yes it does. However 1 of mine has thrown basal shoots and the other (Mother) When I cut it back to bring in, it adjusted for about 2 weeks then shot a leaf roll up from the center and continued as normal. It is a 3' stump with 2 - 6' leaves out the top.
    Originally I received a 12" stump and when I planted in Spring it died and then suddenly shoot appeared from under ground and became what is my mother plant. After 4-6 weeks it sent another shoot from under ground and this is my smaller plant. The mother was cut back, brought in and is now growing in a South window. The smaller however is still planted outside in the ground. It has survived several light frosts with no protection but this will not last long. I will wrap it this weekend for the winter. I suspect it will come from the ground next Spring since the mulching actually keeps the roots alive and the trunk will eventually mush by Spring.
    I have found a banana plant that is hardy to zone 5. It is Musa basjoo and its hybrids. This is a nana from the cloudforests of China which get extremely cold. It does not need wrapping. It does better with a north wind block though. This nana will peel itself back and layer the ground with its leaves thus insulating the roots. It is a listed zone 5 nana. I will be picking up one or 2 of these this Spring. BTW it produces edible fruit also.

    Joe
    \"There is nothing here of interest to any nation, as a matter of fact there is nothing here but humans!\"

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