User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 20

Thread: Banana tree overwintering

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    61
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have several varieties of Bananas I am going to try to overwinter. This is my first effort. They are in a protected spot and I plan to mulch really heavy over them. The question is should I cut the trees down and then mulch or let them freeze and fall over and then mulch over them. These are one year old plants and the largest only have trunks about 7 inches across). Our first few freezes should not harm the roots, only the above ground leaves.

  2. #2
    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    3,472
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    there are several little-known native trees with very very large leaves (3-foot at the most!) that give the tropical effects that bannana planst give without all the work.
    that makes no logic

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    61
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    So tell me more. What are these plants?

  4. #4
    kayaker78's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Salt Lake City, Utah
    Posts
    348
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    http://www.cloudforest.com/northwest/index.html

    This forum should give you all the info you need! If we can grow bananas in Seattle outdoors year round you can definatly do it!

  5. #5
    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    3,472
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Im so glad you asked!

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Bigleaf magnolia boasts the largest simple leaf of
    any species native to North America. Its full fruits provide food
    for towhees, yellow-bellied sapsuckers, and other birds.


    Want to add a bold, tropical look to your Georgia garden? Well, instead of planting that banana tree, try a bigleaf magnolia. With its giant bright green floppy leaves and huge fragrant ivory flowers, this 20-to-40-foot Georgia native is guaranteed to put you in mind of steamy, sultry, faraway places—lush jungles and tropical rainforests. Come across a rare wild-growing grove in a rich wooded cove or ravine and chances are you’ll feel like you’ve stepped back into the days of the dinosaurs.

    Bigleaf magnolia looks primitive because it is primitive. Fossil records show that magnolias have been around for over a hundred million years, and that makes them some of the oldest plants in evolutionary history. Their blooms, unlike those of more recently evolved angiosperms, are large, pale, open, and nectar-less, with little differentiation of parts. Magnolias are pollinated primarily by flower beetles, which pre-date bees and butterflies.
    Read more
    Pawpaw is the only Northern member of its famly [a close releteve of the bananna] and has huge1-foot leaves. Small tree and butterfly food, their unusual flowers are polinated by tricking carrion flies.

    Parhaps the hardyest of all big-leaved plants Is the northern catalpa, with Huge single leaves and orchid-like folowers is native to a small area in the mississipi basin. Look it up i g2g at the moment but ill be back!


    that makes no logic

  6. #6
    Whats it to ya? Finch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    3,472
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The northern catalpa is one of the hardyest trees, piriod. grows too zone 4. very drought tolerent...

    Bigleaf maple boasts the largest leaves in its genus and is native to the west coast.

    Corkwood is a rare, eisily propegated plant that forms thickets of single stemms caped by 7-inch leaves. Wood very light, compareable to basla wood. All but the northern catalpa require a reasonable amout of moisture.

    Hardiness rating

    1 Northern Catalpa
    2 Corkwood
    3 Pawpaw
    (?) bigleaf maple
    5 bigleaf magnolia
    that makes no logic

  7. #7
    Lauderdale's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Fort Lauderdale
    Posts
    1,077
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It would help a lot if we knew where you are located.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Texas, USA
    Posts
    61
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I am located in Lubbock, Texas, zone 7a. I see most of the hardy bananas are rated to zone 7a, except sikkamensis is rated to zone 5. That is why I am mulching and planting in a protected spot. I have not seen any planted bananas anywhere in town so no one seems to be having much luck.

    I know Catalpas, they are common here. I have only seen big leaf Magnolia in Tennessee (at a friends house). We have a smaller variety in our yard. Maples in general do not do good here because of the aridity of the region. Even with watering the leaves dry on our hot days. Corkwood and Pawpaw sounds interesting. Where is a good place to get a start of these two?

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •