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Thread: Rose propagation...

  1. #1

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    Hey guys, i just noticed a few rose bushes popping up around the property and i'm curious, has anyone here propagated them before? Are they really easy from cuttings? And of course, what would you say the more successful method of doing so would be?

    I want to propagate a few and make the property look a little nicer, the spots that they are in get them cut down next time someone mows the lawn, and i'm the only one that'll remember they're there.
    Lithops care info: If you take care of it, it will die.

  2. #2

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    Cuttings dusted with rooting hormone\budding\stratify`d seeds. All are succesful.
    [img]http://home.**********.com/users/pondboy/Neps/Neps%20sig..JPG[/img]

  3. #3

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    Are they wild? If so go with pond boy's suggestion. If cultivated unless they are cetain var. you would have to find a root stock to graft to.

  4. #4
    Somewhat Unstable superimposedhope's Avatar
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    Wild ones are pretty easy no matter what, but if you're lookin for teas then a graft is usually done onto wild stock.

    Joe
    \"There is nothing here of interest to any nation, as a matter of fact there is nothing here but humans!\"

  5. #5

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    Even hybrid teas can survive and grow and bloom on their own roots, although they will be slow to build up size initially. It is becoming more and more common for gardeners in warm climates (those warmer areas without nematode problems) to grow hybrid teas on their own roots since they do not have to worry about winter die-back. Besides that, most gardeners in cold climates are told to plant grafted roses with the graft several inches below the soil line, a situation which will eventually encourage the grafted variety to form its own roots. However, tender modern roses seldom live that long in cold climates without protection and one is usually left with Rosa multiflora or the ubiquitous hybrid cultivar 'Dr. Huey' sprouting vigorously from the rootstock.

    Some roses can be quite easy to propagate from cuttings, whereas others can be buggers. It is recommended to use blooming growth (a stem with flowers that are either about to open or have just finished blooming) in order to prevent an excessive amount of "blind" (non-flowering) growth on the new plant. I don't know if there is any scientific validity to that, but it is better to be safe than sorry in my view.

    Corey [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

  6. #6

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    "i just noticed a few rose bushes popping up around the property"... popping up sounds to me suspiciously as if you have multiflora rosa.

    Does that rose you are interested in propagating look like any of these images per chance-
    http://images.search.yahoo.com/search....&tt=734

    http://images.search.yahoo.com/search....&tt=734

    http://images.search.yahoo.com/search....&tt=734

    If it does, please read this as you might want to reconsider propagating that particular plant-
    http://www.invasive.org/eastern/bioc...floraRose.html
    http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/pubs...antic/romu.htm
    http://tncweeds.ucdavis.edu/esadocs/rosamult.html

    The last link from The Nature Conservancy's Invasive Species Initiative sums it up quite nicely. This plant, if this is what you have, is an introduced species that outcompetes native flora and quite successfully I might add. The quality of any wetlands is but merely the barometer of the associated uplands. This Rosa multiflora would be a plant that most people eradicate from the environment. Out in our area, we have workshops where volunteers gather to sweep through public lands to kill this plant. I have participated in these "workshops". This plant is a threat to the environment and it does now have a foothold in Long Island.

    Here is a map indicating just how big of a foothold it has taken on our land-
    http://plants.usda.gov/cgi_bin....ol=ROMU

    Green areas indicate the plant has "naturalized". This means that in every area that it has naturalized, it has displaced native flora which negatively impacts both native flora and native fauna. These plants are quite adaptive and can actually do quite well in or around wetlands. Not good for carnivorous plant communities.

    If this is what you have, and I don't know that it is, I can give you some tips on eradicating it. Over 100 have been removed from my property and they have not rejuvenated.

  7. #7

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    I think Rose has already propagated: I think she has three kids....

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