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Thread: CITES and US Fish & Wildlife Service

  1. #1

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    Hey Folks,

    I've been reading lots of emails, pms, and TF postings about "Appendix I" plants and so on. I want to clarify something for you.

    "Appendix I" and "Appendix II" refers to plants listed by CITES (Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species). Please note that CITES only concerns itself with INTERNATIONAL trade. The National Sarracenia Conservancy doesn't have to care a rat's bum about CITES as long as it works within the borders of one country, i.e. the USA.
    FYI, the carnivorous plants listed on Appendix I and Appendix II are given in the CP FAQ at:
    http://www.sarracenia.com/faq/faq4340.html

    What you folks DO have to worry about are the species that are under the jurisdiction of the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USF&WS), specifically because of the US Endangered Species Act (ESA). The carnivorous plants that fall under this category are Sarracenia alabamensis, S. jonesii, S. oreophila, and Pinguicula ionantha. People outside of the USA do not have to care about the ESA.

    Just as in CITES, the ESA has two lists. The more imperiled plants are called "Endangered". The carnivorous plants on this list are Sarracenia alabamensis, S. jonesii, S. oreophila (this list, coincidentally, consists of the same Sarracenia as CITES Appendix I, although Appendix I also includes some Nepenthes). The less imperiled plants are called "Threatened", and the only carnivorous plant on this list is Pinguicula ionantha.

    So when working within the USA, it is much more appropriate to refer to the trio of rare Sarracenia using ESA categories, and not CITES categories.

    The shorthand way to refer to plants "protected" by the ESA is to say they are "listed". Another bit of insider jargon is to refer to such species as "T and E" (threatened and endangered). So you might hear two botanists say,

    Botanist 1: Did you mean to say that there are some T&E carnivorous plants?

    Botanist 2: Oh yes, there are four listed species.

    It may seem silly and pedantic, but you'll do well to learn the jargon. You'll be perceived as more familiar with the issues that way.

    Later!
    Carnivorous Plant Newsletter
    Co-editor

  2. #2
    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    Thanks a bunch Barry. Very useful information. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]
    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

  3. #3

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    Thank you ,Barry. I think everyone would benefit if they print this topic for their personal knowledge. Not a bad one to have.
    45 yrs. growin\'
    Founder NASC

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