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Thread: Bog Orchids

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    boglodyte's Avatar
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    Please forgive me if this has been covered efore. I don't have a lot of research time here lately. What are some good bog orchids that I could plant alongside my CP? I want to add something a little different to the bogscape.

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    Cardiac Nurse JB_OrchidGuy's Avatar
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    I wish I could help you. I would like to knwo myself. I hear that cypripedium acuale some plants that grow in bog conditions, but don't quote me on that one. Plus they wouldn't be able to grow in a bog that gets full sun they would get burned up. You could check on orchidspecies.com if you do a search for bog orchids on yahoo to do cross references for pictures and growing conditions. Good luck. I will check back since this interests me too.
    JB
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    boglodyte's Avatar
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    I managed to look around a little and came up with these. If I'm messing up, feel free to jump in there!
    H. repens
    Plat. nivea
    Pogonia
    Cleistes
    Calapogon

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    Cardiac Nurse JB_OrchidGuy's Avatar
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    The habernaria doesn't seem to like alot of sun though, but it will grow like the sarrs just accorcing to orchidspecies.com it is not ful sunner.

    Couldnt find anything on Plat. nivea

    Pogonia ophioglossoides sounds promising if you can find it for sale. pogonia ophioglossoided

    The cleistes sound promising too I like this form myself cleistes I just don;t knwo if they can take full sun of a Sarr bog. Might be worth a try thoguh.

    Calapogon doesnt show up on the orchidspecies.com either there are some goodies you may want to try there though. Let me know if you have any luck finding any please. I don;t want to go start looking and find all these things I want to buy when I cant afford to buy any right now.
    JB
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    boglodyte's Avatar
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    AND HOW!

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    herenorthere's Avatar
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    My favorite bog orchid is Platanthera ciliaris because it's a good looking plant and I haven't killed mine yet. But I don't know a commercial source, other than the Troy Meyers Conservancy. Here's mine - http://troymeyers.com/direct/?014788. Unfortunately, there was very poor germination, even though I sent several capsules of good-looking seed.

    I used to also grow Calopogon tuberosus - http://troymeyers.com/direct/?013961. But something (squirrels, mice, ?) took a couple of my bulbs and the last one rotted in my fridge a couple winters ago. My Meyers seedlings all died too because I was impatient and put them out for what was supposed to be a completely cloudy & rainy day but the sun came out strong.

    A very interesting genus of bog orchids is Dactylorhiza. They range from the Mediterranean up to northern Europe. They're sold by some uppity perennial plant nurseries and, of course, Meyers is another good choice. I don't have any, but think they do something weird like bloom in winter, so they might not be a great choice in a place with hard winters.

    Finally, don't forget the Showy Ladyslipper (Cypripedium reginae). I don't know how far south they'll go, but they are awfully impressive.
    Bruce in CT

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    Here is a site about wisconsin native orchids. 90% are bog orchids. Tho, once again finding them has been tough, I may be getting acouple from troy's.

    http://www.botany.wisc.edu/Orchids/list.html
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    GL

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]A very interesting genus of bog orchids is Dactylorhiza. They range from the Mediterranean up to northern Europe. They're sold by some uppity perennial plant nurseries and, of course, Meyers is another good choice. I don't have any, but think they do something weird like bloom in winter, so they might not be a great choice in a place with hard winters.
    No, they are late-spring and early summer blooming. But virtually no Dactylorhiza are suitable. They usually require alkaline conditions.

    However, D. sphagnicola is from acid bogs and is very easy. If the bog is not too wet then D. maculata *could* survive, but prob best to save your money. Spiaranthes aestivalis is suitable for growing in LFS in a bog. If you don't mind tiny plants then Listera cordata is possible, as is Hammarbya paludosa, but the cost and what you get for money wil probably be wildly disproportionate. These are all very hardy.

    Pogonia ophiglossoides is very very easy to grow and is quite delightful with spikes with their solitary pink flowers on top of them. The plant increases quite rapidly as well, and as it grows from wiry roots rather than a tuber does not succumb to cold and wet in winter like tuberous species can. Highly recommended as the best CP orchid companion to start with.

    Cheers.
    Rob Howe.

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    Seeking: Drosera hilaris (seed)

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