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Thread: Propagating mystery orchid

  1. #1
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    So, recently a friend of mine moved back home and I helped her pack up. She had a sad-looking orchid that was leafless, and the canes had all started to wilt and go papery on the outside. She didn't know what it was (besides an orchid,) let alone how to care for it (it was in shady window with only a 20-watt round fluorescent bulb to supplement,) so she gave it to me. I brought it home, put it in a bright spot with my CPs, and a week or so later noticed that it was putting out a new stalk. Or, it might have started when it was in her possession and just grew to noticable size after I took it in - I'm not sure.
    The other day that friend came up to visit and, seeing how well her orchid was doing (it's even put out a solitary bud) she asked if she could have it back. I told her that I wanted to keep it and make sure that it was getting better (I'm also kind of attached to it,) but that she'd be the first to get anything I propagated from it. Well, a few days later I went to admire my plants and found that said orchid was putting out keiki from the ends of its older stalks.

    Sorry about the low quality of the image, but I think it should be enough for those knowledgable orchid-types out there to get a handle on what I'm talking about. My question is, how do I go about removing and potting up the keiki, and when should this be done? Presently, the largest one is just under an inch long, with three or four little leaves and a few roots (the longest root being almost an inch long.) They're well above the level of the pot, as you can see, so I'm wondering if they'd appreciate something to root into or would rather stay with mom for a while longer. Also, an ID would be handy.
    Thanks,
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
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    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    its a dendrobium.

    wait untill it gets going and puts out some more roots and get a couple inches taller, then clip it off and pot it up.

  3. #3
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    When I clip it, does it need any special treatment before it goes in the pot? I know some succulents need to scar over before going into soil because the open wounds are prone to infection. I remember reading in an orchid book about dividing psuedobulbs by cutting them in half, and it said that the cuts should be covered in paraffin wax to prevent rot. I'm guessing that since keiki are essentially just offsets, they're hardier in this respect and are adapted to just break off and fall to the ground (or whatever substrate they grow on.)
    Thanks again,
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

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    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    just lay it out in open air for 24 hours and it'll be fine.

    i've never heard of cutting a pseudobulb in half.

  5. #5
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (JustLikeAPill @ July 28 2006,7:33)]i've never heard of cutting a pseudobulb in half.
    It seemed like a strange idea to me too, but it was in a very thorough treatment of orchid cultivation that looked to be recently published, so I never really questioned it. I don't think I'd have the guts to try it, however - it seems like too many things could go wrong.
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

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    herenorthere's Avatar
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    I snap off those top-of-the-cane keikis when the roots are 1"+, so it's almost ready. An orchid potting mix is airy enough that there's no need to leave the plantlet lying around. Just put it wherever you want it to grow and secure it in place with a little stake and twist tie. A split popsicle stick works well. I haven't always secured them, but it's caused problems often enough that I plan to always do it in the future.

    It looks like a Phalaenopsis type Dendrobium, which is a relatively easy plant I can't grow. They probably get too cool in the spring when I put them out too early and again in the fall when I leave them out too long.
    Bruce in CT

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    Always a newbie glider14's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (seedjar @ July 28 2006,11:52)]
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (JustLikeAPill @ July 28 2006,7:33)]i've never heard of cutting a pseudobulb in half.
    It seemed like a strange idea to me too, but it was in a very thorough treatment of orchid cultivation that looked to be recently published, so I never really questioned it. I don't think I'd have the guts to try it, however - it seems like too many things could go wrong.
    ~Joe
    Get an Dendrobium Cane. cut it into pieces about 2-3in long. dip bottom in fugucide(optional but helpful). set in LFS or preferred mix. keep misted. i attepted this with success...sorta. the cane grew roots and thats about it. it wilted about a month after the roots formed.
    Alex
    Everything is explainable. The seemingly unexplainable is but a result of our insufficient knowledge.- Hans Brewer

  8. #8
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (glider14 @ July 29 2006,6:05)]Get an Dendrobium Cane. cut it into pieces about 2-3in long. dip bottom in fugucide(optional but helpful). set in LFS or preferred mix. keep misted. i attepted this with success...sorta. the cane grew roots and thats about it. it wilted about a month after the roots formed.
    Alex
    This method I mentioned wasn't for Dendrobium. It was for Cattelya, I believe - one of the bulb-growing genera.
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

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