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Thread: Best way to get started?

  1. #25
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    people grow them in everything you could imagine, including ceramic pebble things. they like to be moist but they should (for most of them ) dry out in between waterings.

  2. #26
    Outsiders71's Avatar
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    Right. I've been doing some more reading. Has anyone tried the double-potting method with these plants?

    I was thinking along the lines of getting a ceramic pot with no drain holes. Fill this with peagravel. This will also act as a water tray. The pot the orchid is in would be filled 1/3 with peagravel then top it off with Coconut Husk Chips. Then place the orchid in the bigger ceramic pot. How does that sound?
    James 1:17

    "Every good and perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of the heavenly lights, who does not change like shifting shadows."

  3. #27
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    they shouldn't sit in water.

    just put them in a pot/basket. it's not complicated.

  4. #28
    Outsiders71's Avatar
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    Ok ok ok...

    I was just thinking if humidity might be a problem indoors, instead of getting a water tray and put gravel in it, I could just double pot it.
    James 1:17

    "Every good and perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of the heavenly lights, who does not change like shifting shadows."

  5. #29
    Cardiac Nurse JB_OrchidGuy's Avatar
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    Outsider this is the exception to the rule of not having orchids sitting in water.
    Semi-hydro orchid cultivation. I have some plants growing in this and the roots that grow down into the water are fine and healthy as can be. You might want to try getting some of these pots. I just have to warn you. You MUST start out with healthy plants when converting over to this form on potting. Because the old roots are not used to this type of potting they normaly die off and get replaced by new ones. And also there are some plants that do not like this culture. Feel free to experiment in potting any way you see fit just realize that deviating too much from the norm at first can kill alot of plants. Atleast untill you get the hang of growing orchids and orchid rescue if you doo get a plant in decline. Feel free to keep asking questions. These are good and I will help answer the best I can.
    JB
    Friend me on facebook with JB_orchidguy@yahoo.com.
    Growlist Updated 05/08/13

  6. #30
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Sorry guys, but I'm gonna start poking at that annoying bubble.

    In a greenhouse in Albuquerque, New Mexico, I was given some horribly sad, complex Cattleya type hybrids. They were covered with a layer of soft scale over every surface of their leaves and pseudobulbs, they had NO live roots, the pseudobulbs were soft and extremely dessicated. When I first had a look at them, I thought to myself that there wasn't much chance to rescue them. But, since they were, "good as dead" I decided to try to revive them.

    First I removed most of the dead roots, rhizome, and pseudobulbs; then, using a pressurized stream of purified water I blasted every trace of the scale from the plants; then I placed them into trays of water (previously prepared - see description below), until just the leaves and top 1" of pseudobulb were protruding; I checked them several times per week to observe their progress.

    Epiphytic and terrestrial water rehabilitation tray:
    - white polyethylene undrained tray 4"W x 4"H x 36"L
    - 1/2" layer of shredded redwood bark (Sequoia species)
    - 3" of low mineral water, D.I. or R.O.
    - generous amounts of live, growing Sphagnum moss to float on the surface
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  7. #31
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    your growing methods never cease to amaze me pingman. good job!

  8. #32
    herenorthere's Avatar
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    Orchids are some of the easiest plants to grow. They love humidity but many cope quite well with dry air. Some can't be over-watered and others hate having their feet be wet for more than a few minutes. Some like intense sun and others are fine with deep shade. My orchids have no idea what a greenhouse or pebble tray or semi-hydro even are. I have no doubt they'd like to get acquainted, but it isn't gonna happen. I just don't have the room and/or ambition.

    Just get orchids and and see what works for you and what doesn't. Trade away the ones that don't seem happy and try others. I only got one Catt to bloom, ever, but that's to be expected with my not-bright-enough growing conditions. I've never had much success with those phalaenopsis-type Dendrobiums from Lowes and such places, but I suspect they don't appreciate the too cool spring and fall weather I force on them. I've never had any luck with the Oncidium hybrids and intergenerics and I have no idea why. Because of the variable often low humidity, I do best with thick-leaved plants. Thin-leaved ones often accordion. This could go on and on.

    Because my orchids go outside for the summer, I tend to pot them in coarser than usual mixes because a week of rain can devastate a normally-potted orchid. I no longer have any orchids in empty orchid baskets. They've done much better since I stuffed some orchid mix among their roots. I have several mounted orchids, but the low indoor humidity in winter can be tough on them. I put my orchids out too early in the spring and leave them out too late in the fall because I've decided a few more weeks outside is more good than a few degrees of cold is bad.

    Everyone does things a little or a lot differently. But the rules-of-thumb, in my opinion, are that less water is safer than more water; less light is safer than more light; less fertilizer is safer than more fertilizer; and less pot is safer than more pot. Orchids come from marginal places that other plants generally don't grow and are adapted to having less.
    Bruce in CT

    Madness is something rare in individuals but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

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