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Thread: How to grow?

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    FarmerDave's Avatar
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    mY parents just got an orchid by the name of Miltassia C.M. Fitch 'Izumi' and they really lke it so I wanted to try and help them keep it, so I was wondering how to grow it.

    help would be nice thanks for reading.

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    Always a newbie glider14's Avatar
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    Miltassia is an intergenic hybrid between a Miltonia and Brassia. they are in the family of the Oncidium's so here is some growing info... btw Aleceara is the family that includes the Oncidiums...
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ] Temperature: The Aleceara hybrids enjoys intermediate temperature ranges: 75-85 degree F. day & 60-65 degreee F. at night.

    Light: Aleceara hybrids prefers filtered, subdued light (from 1000 to 1500 ft. candles). The leaves should be bright green as opposed to dark green or reddish green. Reddish green indicates too much light; dark green indicates not enough light.

    Water: Aleceara should become moderately dry between waterings. Generally, they require more water while the new shoot is growing and less once the bulb has formed. Fertilize your plants at least once a month. Take care to keep water out of the new growth at the base of the plant. Never allow the bottom of the pot to stand in water. Never use artificially softened water.

    Humidity: Aleceara enjoy moist air, requiring a minimum of 40-50% humidity in the immediate vicinity of the plant. Humidity should be increased with higher temperatures. The ideal humidity is between 55 and 75%, with as much ventilation or air movement as possible without any cold drafts. Humidity can be increased around the plant by placing the pot on an inverted saucer in a baking pan filled with pebbles, rock chips, etc., and water. Keep water level below top of pebbles so that the plant will not have "wet feet" from setting in water.Morning misting of foliage is also helpful, especially during periods of hot weather.

    Potting: Repot Aleceara at least every two years. As a general rule, repot them when the new shoot is two to three inches tall or when new roots appear. All the old mix should be removed from the roots and any dead roots should be removed. If dividing, keep the divisions in clumps of three to five mature bulbs. Medium to fine fir bark is preferred. The base of the new growth should be potted about 1/2" (no deeper) into the fresh bark. Keep mix barely damp until you see the new roots penetrating the bark, then resume normal watering.
    Everything is explainable. The seemingly unexplainable is but a result of our insufficient knowledge.- Hans Brewer

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    FarmerDave's Avatar
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    Thanks!

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    herenorthere's Avatar
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    Is it blooming and do you know where it's from? The reason I ask is that the mass market nurseries tend to sell orchids when it's time to repot them again. If it's blooming, it's OK to just let it bloom in peace. If not blooming, it might be a good idea to repot it.

    To test the potting mix, assuming it's bark or a bark mix, just dig down into it with a finger as deep as you can near the middle of the pot and see if it's beginning to disintegrate down there. If not, you can wait until new root growth begins again as described in glider14's's instructions.

    You can still wait to repot if the mix isn't looking good and you don't see signs of new growth, but overwatering is a much bigger threat with an old mix. Make sure you allow it to dry enough between waterings. You can dig down in the mix to get a sense of how dry it's getting.

    By the way, I'm no expert about that plant. I've never had a Miltassia and have failed with the few Miltonias and Brassias I've tried to grow. Their leaves always accordioned (you'll know it if you see it) during their winter months indoors, probably due to the low humidity.
    Bruce in CT

    Madness is something rare in individuals but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

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    Well I don't think that i'll have to worry about low humidity in or house, because it's usually about 60% year round

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