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Thread: Tea cup orchid questions

  1. #9
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    DragonsEye,
    I accept your corrections. I admit that I was being overly broad and cautious - for the sake of a newbie. These newer hybrids can be much more forgiving of higher light, lower temperatures and lower relative humidity - especially as compared to some of their progenitors. I have experience growing some of those progenitors, not as much experience working with these newer hybrids.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  2. #10
    carnivorous plants of the world -- unite! DragonsEye's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joseph Clemens View Post
    I admit that I was being overly broad and cautious - for the sake of a newbie.
    That occurred to me belatedly as I was out and about after posting.

    If the orchids in question are those commonly available in BBSs, then you are right on the money, Joseph. However, should the OP "branch out" into the wider orchid hobby world, then what I said above applies. Didn't want to leave a newbie with less accurate info should that second scenario occur.


    "Blessed are the cracked….
    For they are the ones who let in the light."



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    Here's the root ball is in lfsm and it seems ok but it was really hard
    My house stays about 65 70 daytime and about 60 65 at night
    It's in a western facing window that's it's light source and were it stays
    And I do water it in that tin and I always drain the water


  4. #12
    BS Bulldozer SubRosa's Avatar
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    I would carefully remove as much of that sphag as possible and repot in bark and/or lava rock.
    Judge not lest ye be judged creates a cesspool. Judge others and prepare to be judged by them.
    Just know when to keep the verdict to yourself.

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    And here's the flower if anyone can is it


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    Definitely change the potting mix .. it's impossible to ID most of the phals. Because they are so mass produced. .

  7. #15
    carnivorous plants of the world -- unite! DragonsEye's Avatar
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    It is some sort of Phalanopsis Alliance hybrid. A more accurate ID is and will be impossible. There are simply too many look alike hybrids out there.

    At the temps you mentioned, you are unlikely to see much growth. Most phals prefer warmer temps for active growth.

    Whether to repot -- in bark or lava rock or orchid mix -- or not is really up to you. Many folks advise against using pure sphag. However, I have grown phals in pure sphag with zero issues. I have also grown them in various other media.
    The con: Because of its water retentive properties, it can stay too wet too long -- particular in the very center of the mass. This can lead to rot. In addition, if it dries out completely, it becomes hydrophobic and is a bear to rehydrate. If kept wet, it breaks down fairly quickly.
    The pro: Because of its water retentiveness, in can reduce the frequency of watering needed. Also, sphag seems to have some antifungal properties.

    IME, the common issue in trying to grow phals like that in sphag is not the sphag itself. Rather it is because the sphag has been "trash compacted" into a ridiculously tight mass. This prevents the moss from drying out in a timely fashion -- particularly at the very center. If you should decide to give staying with straight sphag a try, then I would recommend the following. Break apart that compacted mass of sphag and remove all of it from the roots. Loosen up the sphag mass so you can separate the sphag strands -- no solid lumps. (You may be surprised to discover just how much sphag you'll wind up with.) Put the phal's roots back into the pot. You may find it necessary to "screw" the plant in to get the roots fit. LOOSELY refill with sphag. You might only use half of that original lump of sphag. Enough sphag should be used to gently hold the plant in place but definitely not be that dense wad it currently is.

    Many folks, I know, like to pack their media (whatever they choose to use) to the point that you can pick up the plant and the pot (assuming its plastic) comes up with it. I never have found that to work for me. As such, I typically insert a stake into the media after I've repotted such that it stabilizes the plant.

    Last edited by DragonsEye; 02-07-2015 at 06:15 PM.
    "Blessed are the cracked….
    For they are the ones who let in the light."



  8. #16
    BS Bulldozer SubRosa's Avatar
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    I admit to being a serial overwaterer by nature, so sphag is not the media for me to keep Phals in, but DragonsEye's explanation of the pros and cons of it is on the mark.
    Judge not lest ye be judged creates a cesspool. Judge others and prepare to be judged by them.
    Just know when to keep the verdict to yourself.

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