User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 9 to 15 of 15

Thread: How important is lime

  1. #9
    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia/Zone 7
    Posts
    10,335
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you need to add magnesium, you can use a tablespoon of epsom salt in a gallon of water. Epsom salt is an old gardener's plant tonic and I've had orchid growers recommend it. I use it but not with every watering.
    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

  2. #10
    swords's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Cernunnos Woods
    Posts
    8,120
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks Tony,
    Perhaps my Gro More brand urea free orchid fertilizer (with all major elements and some minor) and the aquarium plant fertilizer (for all the minor & trace elements) is all I might need for the Paphs. and not have to worry about adding extra calcium. I was just under the impression I might have to do something exceptional for those species since I'd read about people using things like pieces of cement in their soil mix to add extra calcium.

    How do I raise & stabilize the carbonate hardness of R/O water so that the water does not become too acidic? Do I simply add some baking soda-what porportions will be enough 1/2 tea spoon per gallon or...?

    I feed my Neps every two weeks with crickets so I don't fertilize most of them anymore. But when the plants are only a few centimeters across I water with the balanced Gro More every 2-4 weeks until they create pitchers large enough to feed tiny 2 week old crickets.

    EDIT: Thanks for that link, I love this kind of reading! I indeed know the "aquarium smell" of the ureates which they discuss in the article. I wish they had a chart for Gro More!

  3. #11
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Far Away NY
    Posts
    4,640
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I used to use potassium hydroxide solution to adjust pH. You could use some calcium hydroxide to do the same.. Probably easier to get through the aquarium trade. I would not use baking soda which is sodium bicarbonate. In any event you should first test your pH after you mix up a batch of diluted fertilizer. You might be lucky and find it is fine.

    The use of a calcium component in potting mix, while adding some calcium which the plant needs, is more for neutralizing acidic potting mix. I think in the case of some Paphs it has been shown to be helpful because it maintains the neutral to (in some cases) slightly alkaline root zone. I know the Wellensteins use a crushed oyster shell in these instances. They also use a balanced fertilizer with calcium and all other macro, minor and trace elements. The fertilizer and the crushed shell serve different purposes to the plants health.

    Tony



    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  4. #12
    swords's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Cernunnos Woods
    Posts
    8,120
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ah ha! You could be on to something here... crushed oyster shell! I like the sound of that!

    I received a few huge bags of seashells a while back. After picking out all the specimen shells (and a few weird seeds!) I have many damaged and uninteresting shells that could be crushed up for such a purpose.

    Is there something particular with oyster shells (I have plenty) or will any shell do?

  5. #13
    Tony Paroubek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Far Away NY
    Posts
    4,640
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would think any shell should do. The crushed oyster shells are used in the poultry industry and a byproduct of the oyster (for eating) and pearl industry.

    From my recollection, the shell pieces are flat and flake like but more importantly it is the easiest form of calcium carbonate to dissolve so it is more effective in adding minerals to the potting mix and buffering. Sorry I don't recall the technical term but I think all shells, coral etc are the same form. I would just be sure to soak them several times and rinse well to be sure all the sodium is gone.

    Tony
    Is that a Nepenthes in your pocket or you just happy to see me?

  6. #14
    swords's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Cernunnos Woods
    Posts
    8,120
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks Tony,
    I think I will go with the oyster shell method and see how that does. If I can buffer it "naturally" like this through erosion of shells and not relying on chemicals I would prefer to.

    I picked up both volumes of The Genus Paphiopedilum by Guido Braem today at the orchid shop. The books look like they're geared towards cultivating the Paphs whereas the P. Cribb book looks more like the C. Clarke reference monographs. Have you seen these G. Braem books? I like that the book lists average year round temperatures, humidity, rainfall, light levels, etc. for each species' general area. As we know some of this info this translates to Nepenthes as well so it has a dual purpose! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html312/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif[/img]

    Speaking of Neps John deKanel came by the orchid shop today since he was in town showing some medical device at the Mayo Clinic!

  7. #15
    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia/Zone 7
    Posts
    10,335
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    There is also crushed coral that you can buy at any aquarium shop. Its already pulverized. Its full of the tiniest little sea shells you've ever seen. I've bought some of this and think it might have a number of uses other than with the pings.
    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •