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Thread: Phaleonopsis

  1. #9
    herenorthere's Avatar
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    I use shallow wire baskets, lined with as little coco fiber as possible. My preferred mix these days is a mix of coconut husk chips (CHC) and volcanic rock (the white, giant perlite stuff). The mix is ~3/4 CHC. I've had some nice plants in clay orchid pots too. I use more volcanic rock in a pot (maybe 1/2) and use my rock hammer to enlarge the drain holes. I put several nonbiodegradable packing peanuts on the bottom and some coco fiber on top of the peanuts before adding the mix.
    Bruce in CT

    Madness is something rare in individuals but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

  2. #10

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    [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/confused.gif[/img] Nver mind. Ill just ask somebody for these orchid pots at the garden centre. [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/confused.gif[/img] Are there any other containers that I could use?
    Carnivorous plants growlist:http://www.**********.com/cgi-bin....t=17597
    Onda je sultan pao mrtav do kostura

  3. #11
    chloroplast's Avatar
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    The best ways to grow phals are (1) in glazed ceramic/terra cotta pots with air holes on the side, (2) regular plastic pots...just make sure they have good drainage or (3) in hanging baskets (made of wood sticks with ~ 1cm space between them).

    If you decide on the glazed pots, then I would be VERY careful not to overpot (plant in too big a pot) and would reduce the amount of sphagnum moss in the mix. In fact, the two phals I have growing in pots are in 90% bark chips, 10% sphag moss. Too big a pot or too much moss almost always leads to root rot.

    If you go with the latter (I think wooden baskets are great) then you can add more moss to the mix (moss:bark = 25:75) and there's much less chance for overwatering since so much of the potting medium is exposed to air. However, it also means that you'll have to be more diligent in making sure your plant doesn't dry out, especially if you heat your place during the winter (major humidity drop).

    Whatever you do, do NOT grow them in unglazed terra cotta for two reasons: 1. If the pot remains constantly moist then fungus can start growing on the pot and 2. the pot retains salts which over time can be detrimental to your plant.
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
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  4. #12
    chloroplast's Avatar
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    The best ways to grow phals are (1) in glazed ceramic/terra cotta pots with air holes on the side, (2) regular plastic pots...just make sure they have good drainage or (3) in hanging baskets (made of wood sticks with ~ 1cm space between them).

    If you decide on the glazed pots, then I would be VERY careful not to overpot (plant in too big a pot) and would reduce the amount of sphagnum moss in the mix. In fact, the two phals I have growing in pots are in 90% bark chips, 10% sphag moss. Too big a pot or too much moss almost always leads to root rot.

    If you go with the latter (I think wooden baskets are great) then you can add more moss to the mix (moss:bark = 25:75) and there's much less chance for overwatering since so much of the potting medium is exposed to air. However, it also means that you'll have to be more diligent in making sure your plant doesn't dry out, especially if you heat your place during the winter (major humidity drop).

    Whatever you do, do NOT grow them in unglazed terra cotta for two reasons: 1. If the pot remains constantly moist then fungus can start growing on the pot and 2. the pot retains salts which over time can be detrimental to your plant.
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
    Member, International Carnivorous Plant Society (ICPS)
    Member, North American Sarracenia Conservancy (NASC)
    Member, The Carnivorous Plant Society (CPS)

  5. #13
    chloroplast's Avatar
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    oops..sorry for the double post.
    Secretary, New England Carnivorous Plant Society (NECPS) http://www.necps.org/
    Member, International Carnivorous Plant Society (ICPS)
    Member, North American Sarracenia Conservancy (NASC)
    Member, The Carnivorous Plant Society (CPS)

  6. #14
    herenorthere's Avatar
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    People questioning their ability to grow Phals should be encouraged by the wide range of recommendations. The moral of the story is that just about anything can work. Phals like moisture and air around their roots. Any combination of container, potting material, and watering schedule providing that will work.
    Bruce in CT

    Madness is something rare in individuals but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

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