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Thread: Cobras in florida

  1. #9
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    Darlingtonia in southern Oregon endure some very high temperatures during the summer. I'm not sure how cold cobra lilies like it in the winter - they often maintain their leaves through snows in the wild - but you could certainly grow plants with those summer temps. If the plant you bought was raised in cooler temperatures, you will probably have to acclimate it and give it attention, such as watering to cool the roots.
    I have several batches of seedlings that do fine without any such treatment, though; they just sit in trays and I water them when the water level gets low. In the wild, there are stands of cobras that grow in boggish conditions, in clay soil and full sun, with hard (150-240 ppm!), stagnant water and relatively low humidity (55% average.) Darlingtonia that are mass produced for retail in laboratory conditions acclimate to cooler temperatures, higher humidity, and lower light levels provided by the lab. They seem to think they're growing in the forest or mountains, and from the experiences I've read here and elsewhere, store-bought cobras never really get over that notion. It seems that if you start with seeds, you can bring out the heat- and light-tolerant traits. Seed-raised plants adapt to the environment they're given.
    I think you can get your plant to work with a little patience and TLC. But if it gives you any trouble, you should try some seed from the ICPS seed bank or a CP retailer. Cobras can be easy plants, so I think you should grow them the easiest way. Even nursery-bred seed seems to have some of the hardier, wildtype characteristics left in it. Seeds are cheap, so it might be worth your while to get some anyways; I spent about $6 on cobra seeds last year and I now have over 50 one-inch seedlings to show for it. Next year they'll be big enough to trade them on the forums here for all sorts of new stuff, and all it'll cost me is shipping.
    By the way, welcome to the forums! You've come to the right place. Make sure to check out www.sarracenia.com, like JimScott said - that's essential. If you can, try to find a copy of the book The Savage Garden by Peter D'Amato; your library should have it, as it's one of the most well-known books on the topic in recent time.
    Best luck,
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

  2. #10

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    Thanks Joe! I'm going to try to grow this first plant outside in addition to growing some from seeds.

    I was also wondering how many people sell their plants to make some extra cash. I'm not talking big business just something small to supplement their main income. I was thinking about rigging a small greenhouse in the backyard to get a large number of plants growing. How does one get started? Seeds, root cuttings, leaf cuttings? Basically, what is the fastest way of aquiring a large number and variety of plants?

    Chris

  3. #11
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (cstriker @ Nov. 09 2005,5:57)]How does one get started? Seeds, root cuttings, leaf cuttings? Basically, what is the fastest way of aquiring a large number and variety of plants?

    Chris
    Welcome to the forums! For the most part, we do all of the afore-mentioned approaches. I found that the fastest way to acquire plants was to respond to the Trading Post offerings and cultivating friendships. Nearly all of my collection has come from the generosity of the forum members.

  4. #12
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    You can find out everything you need to know about propagation in The Savage Garden, but you also may be able to find quite a bit by browsing the links on BobZ's CP Photo Finder. Generally speaking, leaf and root cuttings are the fastest way to propagate the plants that work by those methods. Many CPs readily produce offsets on runners or stolons in the right conditions, as well. Seeds are an inexpensive way to start new species, but slow relative to other methods of propagation.
    To get a variety of plants, find seeds from retailers or join the ICPS and keep an eye on the seed bank. Watch the trading forums here - many types of seed and starts are available if you provide postage. To get adult plants soon, you'll likely have to go and buy some from a garden center or order them from a CP nursery. TerraForums here is hosted by **********.com and has a lot of good plants for beginners, and the CP FAQ has a good listing of other retailers. But once you have a modest collection of plants, you can propagate them and trade the clones with people here on the forums. Once you're to that point, your only problem will be finding space and time for all your plants.
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

  5. #13
    CopcarFC's Avatar
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    I say keep an eye on the forum give-a-ways and keep an eye on E-Bay. You can get some very nice plants and lots of seed there.

    -Rail
    My life sucks

  6. #14

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    I plan on using the tray method as well as using a pump to constantly water overhead. I'm going to try to beat the central florida heat.

    Should I change the way they are watered in the winter? I read they should sit in no more than a quarter inch of water during their dormancy. What do you all think?

    Chris

  7. #15
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    The prevailing opinion is that when it's winter, CP's, in general, should be kept barely moist. Tamlin Dawnstar posted about an odd circumstance whereby some of his plants were accidently flooded out - and did well. I can't speak about Cobra lilys, specifically, though.

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    I can. Some area's in Oregon and California have large stands of Cobra's. They live with their rhizome underwater 365 days a year, 24/7. They do very well. Water temps there are anywhere from 55 to 75 degrees F. I should mention the water is constantly in motion, much like JimScott's "stream". The sphagnum is thick in some areas, non existant in others. The plants are beautiful.



    45 yrs. growin\'
    Founder NASC

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