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Thread: Sarracenia Purpurea

  1. #9
    RL7836's Avatar
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    I agree w/ most of what's been said except:
    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]If I didn't have the natural bog, I would just cover them with 1-2' of leaves, and then uncover in spring.
    Fallen leaves tend to form a fairly impervious layer over your plants and, depending on the conditions, may smother them. Another grower who had a number of rare VFT cultivars lost all of them the year he decided to cover his bog w/ leaves.

    As PoWeRPSUHort recommended, pine needles (or maybe straw) are reasonably ideal as they provide dead air space which helps insulate your plants w/ out completely cutting off air exchange (although that does sound like a dichotomy... [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile_l_32.gif[/img] )
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    Leaves aren't all the same. Maple leaves are plant killers because they mat down and suffocate whatever's beneath them. Oak leaves, on the other hand, curl up and will stay loose, especially is you keep snow off them. I have a supply of needles from a white pine and leaves from a pin oak and consider the leaves to be a better blanket.
    Bruce in CT

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    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    In most natural bogs, Sarracenia are in the open so viturally no leaves are present for any sort of insulation, not even pine needles. I just let the snow insulate.

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    I used to do that, but found that the pitcher quality in the following season was better after application of the pine needle mulch coupled with a spring burn.

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    It all depends on where you are and what's available. Dustin can probably count on a good snow cover, but I'll usually have little or no snow on the ground at least a couple times every winter. So snow works well for Dustin and I use leaves from the pin oak in front of my house. And rig up a little lean-to to keep the snow off those leaves. If an oak tree weren't so convenient, I wouldn't drive around looking for one; I'd experiment with pine needles from the back yard or maybe do something completely different.
    Bruce in CT

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]In most natural bogs, Sarracenia are in the open so viturally no leaves are present for any sort of insulation, not even pine needles. I just let the snow insulate.
    Oh come on. you must have quite different natural bogs by you..
    First off they grow mixed in with grasses and sedges, and grass mats down just as much as leaves from trees.
    The locations I have found Sarracenia purpurea growing have had a good amount of trees and shrubs near by or directly by them. Most of the time the trees are white pine or black spruce, but also swamp white oak, black maple (i think its black other wise its green) shrubs are the dogwoods, buckthorn, all of the bog berries.

    Just a quick look at some pictures... These are the ways I have seen them. Not my pictures, just browsing google images..
    http://www.jakobaxelsson.se/images/p...purpurea_1.jpg
    http://cricket.biol.sc.edu/herb/SS/S..._purpurea3.jpg
    http://androsace.com/data....ea.jpeg
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    herenorthere's Avatar
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    The plant community depends on a bog's successional stage. I knew some bogs in Maine where S. purpureas were growing with little sedge growth and no trees or shrubs nearby. But it's only a matter of time before those bogs will be filling with the plants you mentioned.
    Bruce in CT

    Madness is something rare in individuals but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule. Friedrich Nietzsche

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    Nepenthes Specialist nepenthes gracilis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]First off they grow mixed in with grasses and sedges, and grass mats down just as much as leaves from trees.
    The locations I have found Sarracenia purpurea growing have had a good amount of trees and shrubs near by or directly by them. Most of the time the trees are white pine or black spruce, but also swamp white oak, black maple (i think its black other wise its green) shrubs are the dogwoods, buckthorn, all of the bog berries.
    Grasses will decay before the onset of winter. Almost all Sarracenia bogs I've been too are fairly open expect for cranberry plants and some shrubby stuff, but those little leafes have no insulation factor whatsoever, remember, a bog is a "microclimate". It is its own little world in essence. Most of the trees you mention aren't in close vincinity to the bogs acidic range, just on the margin of it, only trees I'm familar with are all the needle leafed ones which ALWAYS surround a bog.

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