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Thread: Sarracenia in central Florida (near Tampa)

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    I have S. leucophylla and S. flava plants that have been growing outside since October. By the end of November they stopped producing new pitchers all together. How do I know if they are dormant? Do they produce phyllodia in the winter?

    Also, has anyone tried growing S. oreophila or S. rubra ssp. jonesii in central Florida before? Do we get enough of a winter for them to go sufficiently dormant?

    Better yet, which Sarracenia species will not grow in central Florida? Thanks!

    Chris

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    Send in the Clones Houstonherp's Avatar
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    Chris -

    Central FL is very similar to the Houston, Texas area (where I am located). I have found that the summer heat is of more concern than how cold it gets in winter. Appalachicola National Forest has great Sarracenia diversity, and I think that all but the most northerly of Sarrs (S. purpurea ssp. purpurea, and possibly purpurea ssp. montana and rubra ssp. jonesii) will do fine in your area.

    BTW - I have some jonesii that I've grown from seeds planted last spring, and they are loving the wintertime temps!

    Mike
    Mike Howlett

    "Leuc, I am your flava!"

    Now we know Princess Leah's last name: Wilkerson!!

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    Hi Chris,
    Oreophila can be a little touchy, but not impossible, even as far south as Orlando. The purp purp forms from north of the Carolinas can be difficult. Our summers are too long. Otherwise, the rest will do fine for you.
    While in dormancy, you might want to cut back on the watering. Let them go a little dry...for us, watering about once every five days works. When they come out of dormancy in early March, pour on the water.

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    S. minor is the most southerly species, growing as far as Okeechobee County:

    Map

    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]I have S. leucophylla and S. flava plants that have been growing outside since October. By the end of November they stopped producing new pitchers all together. How do I know if they are dormant? Do they produce phyllodia in the winter?
    They sound dormant. They should produce no growth whatsoever for about 2 months.
    Alexis Vallance, U.K.
    Plant gallery
    Grow list

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    They look like they're dead-Michelle calls it 'permanent dormancy', but look closely at the growth tips. They should be a bright red over green. You can see there's still life under the soil.
    Ironically, S, minor is one of the most difficult species to grow. If you want to see them, there is a stand east of you out on highway 60 east of Lake Wales. Best time to see 'em is mid May before the rains start, but there's fresh new pitchers and some early bloomers too.

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    indymental's Avatar
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    Flava should produce phyllodia when they go into dormancy and usually lots of them.

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    And the phyllodia are starting to look pretty ratty right about now. Brown edges and reddish flushing. It's normal.

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    But mine don't seem to have any phyllodia. The phyllodia I've seen in pictures look like leaves almost. My plants have what look like small immature pitchers. Most of these immature pitchers look alive except for the very tip. The plants by no means seem dead or dying I'm just questioning whether they're dormant or not. Only time will tell.

    By the way, each plant is in a 4 inch pot and the nursery I purchased them from said they weren't fully mature yet. Each plant grows pitchers that are about a 1 foot tall. Could I try dividing the rhizome now to propagate more plant or should I wait? By that I mean are they too young for divisions? Thanks!

    Chris

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