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Thread: Applying orthene/acephate

  1. #1
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    Talking

    So some sort of chewing insect is circulating among my Sarras and other outdoor plants. I got a bottle of Ortho Systemic Insect Killer (active ingredient Orthene, aka acephate) but I'm a little confused. The bottle says to apply it to all surfaces of the affected plants, which won't be easy for some of my plants, such as my S. purpurea colony. I thought that systemic insecticides were absorbed by the plant - can't I just apply it to exposed surfaces, so that whatever nibbles on the plants will get poisoned? Will it not work if I don't get everything?
    Also, what kind of handling procedures do you folks use with this stuff? I was figuring on wearing long clothes, gloves and a bandana and then throwing them all in a hot wash when I'm done. Is this adequate? Will washing them in my washing machine create a contamination risk? I've heard nasty things about insecticides and I don't want to take chances.
    Thanks guys,
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

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    Always a newbie glider14's Avatar
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    well i dont think you need to be that through on spraying the surfaces. latex gloves would work fine as my dad is a landscaper/plant grower person and he isnt even allowed to spray plants without LATEX gloves. as long as you dont get it on you, you should be ok with the washing stuff. the gloves you can just dispose of. one thing to make sure says my dad is to only spray them when there is litle to no wind. that way you can prevent it getting on yourself or even you or your neighbors inhaleing it.
    glider
    Everything is explainable. The seemingly unexplainable is but a result of our insufficient knowledge.- Hans Brewer

  3. #3
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    Well, I live on the top floor of a three-story apartment building situated on one of the highest hills in town, so there's going to be wind no matter what I do. I'll probably spray inside my greenhouse. I was thinking of just reaching in with the sprayer and not actually going inside myself, but I'm not sure I'll be able to get a good coat on all the plants that way... Hopefully there will be a still, rainy day soon. This is so stressful! Thanks for the tips, though.
    ~Joe

    PS - Also, I'm wondering about handling the plants... Many of my Sarras and VFTs are badly in need of repotting. Will acephate eat away at the new plastic pots? Will handling treated plants be harmful? Bottom line... should I repot before treating my plants, or after?
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

  4. #4
    Always a newbie glider14's Avatar
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    if your worried about that then i would repot them before.i have no clue on the eating plastic thing....after a while they should be ok but the trick my dad uses is that he LIGHTLY smells them...if he smells even the slightest trace its still not ok. but that is with bare hands i think latex gloves would be ok though
    Everything is explainable. The seemingly unexplainable is but a result of our insufficient knowledge.- Hans Brewer

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    O Seedy One! Orthene will do nothing against chewing insects. Orthene is made for suckers, not chewers. Aphids, whitefly, thrips, scale, and mealybugs will die in droves with orthene. Chewing critters will appreciate the "salad dressing" and keep on chewing. Spray lightly with malathion,or liquid sevin, and the chewers will chew themselves to death.
    45 yrs. growin\'
    Founder NASC

  6. #6
    VFT and Drosera lover vft guy in SJ's Avatar
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    For the record, Orthene, aside from smelling exceptionally foul, is fairly benign to anything except the above mentioned "suckers". I wouldnt worry about the pots, I dont wear gloves or even long clothes when I spray it. Just a good wash of the hands after and all is good to go.
    There are only 2 infinite things... the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not too sure about the universe.

  7. #7
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tip Bugsy. I'm not sure what exactly is at my plants, just that they have chew marks reminiscent of caterpillars and fine, sticky white filaments near the chews. Last year I got a 'Leah Wilkerson' clone from Brooks that had some Xyra moth damage, but he had treated it and trimmed off all but one pitcher to make sure that no more than one egg would be included. I also received a few plants in trade that had scale (but had been treated with acephate,) and some of my cacti have something that looks like scale but fuzzier, so I wanted to treat them to just as a precaution. I'm pretty confused, though, because none of my Sarras were showing any symptoms until a few weeks ago. Nothing has been introduced into my outdoor collection for a month or two except for some perfectly healthy plants that came from Sarracenia NW, whom I trust deeply. Should I try both acephate and malathion? I have some malathion, but I'm nervous about using it because it has other stuff in it - it's Ortho's Malathion Plus variety and it has petroleum distillate in it (plus 50% "other ingredients," thanks for the warning Ortho,) which I understand is bad for most CPs. Thanks for the help guys - these pest outbreaks almost make me want to get rid of my plants. Every day that I don't treat them I feel more and more guilty.
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

  8. #8

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    Guilty? What! You care!?!?!?!? Good! Do it. LIGHTLY spray with this stuff and do it in shade. Sunlight mixed with this stuff could burn the leaves. Spray, VERY FINE mist, leaves only. Some will drip into the soil I'm sure, but it hasn't killed any of my sarrs yet.
    45 yrs. growin\'
    Founder NASC

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