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Thread: My First Dormancy Attempt

  1. #9

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    Just because you are not attached to them, Mannex, doesn't mean you do not give it a chance. Seems a little cold to me. I think, personally, they are toast, but Scotty has a point, they might fool us all. Months is short compared to forever.
    I grow mine outdoors, and they are kept submerged 24/7. They love it. Even in the winter, they are under ice cold water. They come back year after year, bigger and healthier all the time. So, fridge dormancy, too wet, is an absolute no-no. You might try talking to Joe (JBL). He is in Pennsylvania, and maybe could give you tips on winter keeping of your plants.



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  2. #10
    scottychaos's Avatar
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    I doubt the problem was that 45 degrees is too cold.
    45 degrees should be fine.
    I keep mine in a regular fridge all winter..35-40 degrees.
    they do fine.

    I keep hearing about the submerged idea!
    I might try that for winter dormancy.
    I know Tamlin has had success with that method too.
    hmmmm..

    the only drawback to that method is you have to repot every spring.
    can be a big job if you have a lot of plants.
    By keeping my plants in pots all winter, I only repot every 3 years or so..

    Scot

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    Not me, Scotty. Some of these have been in the same base for 5 years. 2 more, and I will repot, and make divisions. I grow in Rubbermaid plastic dishpans, and have kept them under water for as long as I can remember. Many folks dry theirs down for winter, and let dormancy do its thing. Many also suffer losses during this time. I think fungus' like the damp conditions, and have a merry time destroying the rhizomes during the sleeping season.
    I use tannic acid in the spring, and white vinegar to increase soil acid, and simply keep them submerged. They respond VERY well to this treatment. I have a whole lot of buds coming up right now, and they are going to be subjected to the tannic acid/vinegar treatment on March 1st. Tannic treatment also helps red form s. flava's get the red color, and retain it. Tannins in the water also inhibit algae growth.



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  4. #12
    Woodnative's Avatar
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    I wonder if your problem could have been that the plants were actively growing when you plunged them into dormancy. Most of the Home Depot plants are tissue cultured and pretty small when you buy them. The plants need to "see" the shortening days (lengthening dark period), perhaps with cooler weather, to go dormant. There are a lot of physiological changes associated with dormancy, plunging an actively growing plant into a cool dark area is not the same as putting a dormant plant into a cool dark area. It is possible that your storage method was fine, your plants just were not ready.
    I am in NJ. I grow my Sarrs in large, plastic pots. They stay outside until November and experience natural conditions and a few light frosts. Before we get a long, hard freeze they go into my attached garage, where it stays cool all winter, and then back outside in May. Good lucke!

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Just because you are not attached to them, Mannex, doesn't mean you do not give it a chance.
    Mannex, I agree with this. If you have the space--and it won't be used for something else in the meantime--why not? And plastic pots are very very cheap so you can always buy more.

    In any case, keeping them for a few months will give you an idea of just how "good" or "bad" your dormancy conditions were. Sometimes looks can be deceiving: especially when it comes to CPs. Your "dead" looking plants may not be dead at all. I can't recall how many times one of my "dead" CPs resurrected after several months. So if they come back after a few months, you didn't do as bad as you thought....and if they don't, then it may be time to make radical changes to your dormancy conditions.

    Hope you decide to keep them...and hope you're surprised by new growth in the near future! [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]
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  6. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Bugweed @ Feb. 23 2006,3:18)]Not me, Scotty. Some of these have been in the same base for 5 years. 2 more, and I will repot, and make divisions. I grow in Rubbermaid plastic dishpans, and have kept them under water for as long as I can remember. Many folks dry theirs down for winter, and let dormancy do its thing. Many also suffer losses during this time. I think fungus' like the damp conditions, and have a merry time destroying the rhizomes during the sleeping season.
    I use tannic acid in the spring, and white vinegar to increase soil acid, and simply keep them submerged. They respond VERY well to this treatment. I have a whole lot of buds coming up right now, and they are going to be subjected to the tannic acid/vinegar treatment on March 1st. Tannic treatment also helps red form s. flava's get the red color, and retain it. Tannins in the water also inhibit algae growth.
    Steve,
    do you mean you submerge the entire bog?
    media and all??
    I was thinking you were removing the rhizomes and floating them in water..

    any pics? [img]http://www.**********.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/new/smile.gif[/img]

    Scot

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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Woodnative @ Feb. 23 2006,9:55)]I wonder if your problem could have been that the plants were actively growing when you plunged them into dormancy...
    Yeah, that thought occured to me too. I was scared about letting them get too cold, and probably stuffed them in early. And I'm positive they were TC'd, because there was a lot of small crowded growth on them.

    Today I took a small knife and put a small notch in each rhizome to see what was going on in there, and the insides of most were some dark reddish-tan-brownish color, and I read that healthy rhizomes were white. Although, in the S. minor rhizome, beneath the hard brown "bark" coating, there was actually some white in there so that's staying, but I bet the rest have gone to that big garden in the sky.

  8. #16
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    Hey Ryan, I'm sorry to hear of your troubles. I'm not sure where you live in PA, but I live near Philly. I overwinter my plants in an unheated sunporch. It can get into the low 20s for brief periods of time, and all plants are fine. The key I think is good circulation, keeping the plants JUST DAMP and I think even the light helps to keep fungus down. I'll be dividing some plants soon, so PM me about your specific losses.
    My chicken legs taste like chicken--only less meaty.

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