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Thread: S. rosea

  1. #1
    FarmerDave's Avatar
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    I was just curious what the differences between S. Purpurea and S. rosea were? I currently own a Purple Pitcher Plant but I'm unsure what the differences were between them were.
    If you can help me thanks.

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    白人看不懂 Drosera36's Avatar
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    Check this out: S. rosea discussion

    Apparently, it's just S. purpurea ssp. venosa var. burkii. So, it's basically S. purpurea ssp. venosa, the southern subspecies. Just small differences.

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    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    They are pretty consistent and distinct differences hence the logic of species classification. Pitchers are broader and more colourful. The flower larger, lighter in colour and is on a shorter stalk.

    If you can post a pic, we'll see if we can tell which it is
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    Always a newbie glider14's Avatar
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    like some said in there im going to use S. rosea just because its an easier name to remember. S. purpurea ssp venosa var burkie...yea too hard for my memory . id like to eventually get S. rosea what ever its status is as a plant.
    Alex
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]They are pretty consistent and distinct differences hence the logic of species classification. Pitchers are broader and more colourful. The flower larger, lighter in colour and is on a shorter stalk
    I still disagree with the species tag.

    S. purpurea ssp. venosa var. burkii (as I like to call it ) is more similar to plain ssp. venosa than ssp. purpurea is!
    I have a ssp. venosa that has pitchers virtually identical to that of burkii!

    Let's look at them in some detail:

    HOOD:
    Venosa: large or very large. Various degrees of undulation.
    Burkii: large or very large. Various degrees of undulation, usually very undulating.
    Purpurea: small, uniform, tight, round.

    PITCHER SHAPE:
    Venosa: large, squat, bulbous.
    Burkii: large, squat, bulbous. Longer in spring, more bulbous later on.
    Purpurea: smaller, narrower, less bulbous, longer.

    TEXTURE:
    Venosa: rough.
    Burkii: rough.
    Purpurea: smooth and waxy.

    PITCHER COLOR:
    Venosa: green and lightly veined, heavily red veined or all red.
    Burkii: veined, pink or all red.
    Purpurea: green and lightly veined, heavily red veined or all red.

    LIP:
    Venosa: thick.
    Burkii: thicker.
    Purpurea: thin.

    FLOWER:
    Venosa: large and red. Long stem.
    Burkii: large, pink or magenta petals with white style. Short stem.
    Purpura: smaller and dark red. Long or short stem.

    I can't see any large enough differences to elevate burkii to a whole new species. Remember that ssp. venosa and ssp. purpurea flowers are actually quite different from one another. Leaving aside colour, the flower characteristics of venosa and burkii are very similar.

    I believe there are some genetic differences between venosa and burkii, and I think it would be good to hear more about them if anyone has any info.

    I know Barry has joined the rosea camp recently, but I can't see enough evidence personally to join him at the moment



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    Just weighing in. I'm a total newbie to CPs, but I just received a burkii/rosea in the mail, and it seems very different from the venosa I had for two years. The pitchers seem much thicker-walled and waxier, and the color is more of a red than a reddish-purple. I haven't had the opportunity to observe flowers in person, but the differences there are already evident. It seems to me that the species argument was started by someone who just wanted to have a species to their credit. As a bio buff, it seems to me that there should just be one species and three subspecies: purpurea, venosa, and rosea. Couldn't that sort of satisfy all of the different camps? This seems too simple, there must be something I'm misssing... haha the ICPS should just make a ruling, and let everyone get on with their growing.

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    BobZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (jrod @ Aug. 14 2006,1:29)]the ICPS should just make a ruling
    The ICPS is not the taxonomic judge and jury. The procedure is to publish a description in the open literature. The validity of that description is then argued ad nauseam, with some taxonomists subscribing to the classification and others refuting it. Over time, there tends to be a convergence of opinion, but occasionally not. The CP Database is the opinion of one noted taxonomist, Jan Schlauer.

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