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Thread: Having repotted a young Cephalotus plant

  1. #1
    Moderator Cindy's Avatar
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    Aug 2001
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    Having repotted a young Cephalotus plant

    This young plant was repotted from a narrower pot a couple of days ago.

    I was half expecting the plant to suddenly lose all the pitchers and die down to a stump but I remembered to do a thing or two as recommended by the experts here.

    1. The plant was in peat/fine sand mix. Some of the orginal media when taken together with the whole plant and placed into the new mix of LFS/perlite.

    2. The plant was originally covered with a cup which has a hole at the top for ventilation. After repotting, the cup is still used.

    3. The plant in its new pot is placed at the original spot.

    A few questions for the experts.

    1. Are young cephs less prone to repotting shock?

    2. How long can a ceph remain in a pot before it needs to be repotted again? This plant was in its old pot for a year after it arrived as a TC plant. The newer pot is about 3X the diameter of the plant.

    3. Since the plant was growing happily in the previous pot, does it show that the media had some form of beneficial fungus/bacteria?


  2. #2
    Moderator Alexis's Avatar
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    Sep 2001
    Manchester, UK
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    Did you unpot it, shake off all the soil and then repot - or take it in its original soil and just place it in a bigger pot. The less the roots are disturbed, the less likely it is to notice it's been repotted.

    I don't know if young 'uns are any more tolerant, but as long as the pot is large, a ceph should never need repotting in theory.

    If it was doing well before, it would have been because you've replicated its wild conditions well, not because of any secret fungus or bacteria.

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