User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 9 to 14 of 14

Thread: Sarracenia flava troubles

  1. #9
    JRFxtreme's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Miami, FL
    Posts
    536
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Just wanted to echo what Jack said. My S. flava "red tube" is reeaally slow compared to any of my other Sarras.

    I'm starting to think its a weak clone. I've been having issues with it ever since I received it, sucks because its also the most expensive plant in my collection.

  2. #10
    Moderator Alexis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Manchester, UK
    Posts
    956
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    S. flava is a spring grower. It's probably done its main growth for the year and will probably just grow phyllodia until next spring.

    Leave it and be patient.

  3. #11
    A yellow M&M Jefforever's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    over the rainbow (in the U.S.)
    Posts
    1,637
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I agree with NAN, it's shock.

  4. #12
    Moderator Alexis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Manchester, UK
    Posts
    956
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Shock? You can uproot a sarracenia, send it through the post, pot it up and it will be going again in no time.

    S. flava does its thing early in the year and won't grow decent pitchers until the next spring.

  5. #13
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    7,506
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well then, by your own argument replanting now should do no harm.

    Also as you noted in the purpurea thread organics tend to do as they damn well please, so generalizations need not apply.

    My flava that starting growing in mid-late Feb is still happily pushing up pitcher leaves (photos taken today):




    But one one plant is doing doesn't mean that another plant, even a clone or division or growing point of the same plant is doing. I have an S. oreophila division that broke off in shipment from a division I received in March. The undeveloped pitchers that were on the smaller division are still unopened and have hardly grown in length - the root snapped off this division in transit. All the undeveloped pitchers on the larger piece have opened and it is putting up new leaves.

    There is merit to your argument, it is possible that the plant in question is past the active pitcher growth phase. Contacting the eBay seller to find out when the plant started putting up new leaves could shed some light on this.

    Growth is affected by many factors: how long ago was the rhizome divided (if ever, it could be from seed), when did the plant start growing this year, what were the growing conditions prior to shipment, the genetics of the individual plant, the condition of the plant after shipment - to name just a few.

    Sarracenia are tough. A friend of mine received some bare rhizomes that were mislabeled as Nepenthes and not paying attention due to fatigue he potted them up in Nepenthes mix with plenty of orchid bark. They didn't die. They didn't grow very well, but they didn't die. Whether they would have survived more than one growing season is unknown because they were repotted into "proper" Sarracenia mix. Yes, Sarracenia are tough but they are not indestructable as anybody who has had a Sarracenia die on them will attest.

    Neophytes (newbies) are as likely to kill as many plants by overhandling as by other cultivation errors. This is due to the novelty of these unique and wonderful plants as much as inexperience. So there is also much merit to leaving it be.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  6. #14
    Moderator Alexis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Manchester, UK
    Posts
    956
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well yes, replanting now would do no harm, but repotting as a way of forcing it to grow when there's nothing wrong with what it's in at the moment would be pointless.
    There's also a difference in the place on the rhizome the pitchers sprout from, as with the purp, and the growth habit of specific species. A recovering plant will grow in a different manner yes, but there's no wayy ou're going to get oreophila or flava sprouting a crop of spectacular pitchers in September for example.
    From what I can understand from the plant in question in this thread, it's grown a nice crop of pitchers and isn't do much at the moment. Which is exactly what flavas tend to do. Yes, a few smaller pitchers will probably appear at some point, as in your photos, but poking and prodding a flava because it's probably finished it's main crop for the year and blaming it on shock is barking up the wrong tree.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •