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Thread: Just venting

  1. #9

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    To answer some of the questions. Yes, the seeds came from a reliable source.

    Also, the seeds were not buried. They were gently sprinkled evenly on the soil.

    JustLikeAPill, we had one group of seeds that were kept in the fridge for a while, then sprinkled on the soil and placed in the greenhouse. We also had another group that we kept in the fridge (just like the other group), then taken out and placed between 2 moist paper towels and refrigerated again for a while, and then sprinkled on the soil and the whole tray was refrigerated, and then finally placed in the greenhouse. I'm not sure if that makes sense.

    I do have some droseras (binata and multifolda (sp?)), but I wanted something that would grow bigger and better able to withstand Ohio's weather (inside and out). Besides, some of the sarrs are also neat looking.

  2. #10
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    A minimum of four weeks cold stratification (cold =>32F and <=45F, damp - not wet) for most species of temperate CPs including Sarracenia. Some such as Sarracenia purpurea ssp purpurea 5 weeks is recommended. The media should be barely damp and checked once a week for mold/algae/fungus.

    The experiment should include different lengths of stratification.

    I would use a minimum of 20 seeds per group.

    You can probably still cold stratify the seeds by placing the pots seeds and all in sealed plastic bags into the fridge for at least 4 weeks. After stratification add about an inch of distilled or RO purified water in the bottom of the bags, keep them sealed with plenty of air and place them in an area of bright light (avoid direct sunlight as it will quickly cook the contents of the bags). Germination should start around 2 weeks but may take several months. Check weekly for dampening off (fungus). A thin layer of finely milled Long Fibered Sphagnum moss can prevent this.

    Barry Rice says he doesn't give up on a pot of seeds until two years have passed.

    The ICPS seedbank has seeds available for educators such as yourself. Contact information and germination guides can be found on their website.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  3. #11
    Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, England PlantAKiss's Avatar
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    Seeds should be stratified for several months but you can make do with less. But if they were only stratified for 3 weeks or so, that might not be enough. It also takes some time to germinate.

    I've had success laying seed on a paper towel, misting the towel until its just moist. Then I fold up the paper towel, put it into a baggie and stick it in the fridge for a couple of months. Its worked very well.
    "Fox terriers are born with about four times as much original sin in them as other dogs." - Jerome K. Jerome

  4. #12

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    Would there be a chance they would germinate if I stick the tray in the fridge (I'm sure my wife wouldn't like it. ) for a while?

  5. #13
    Moderator Alexis's Avatar
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    Sounds like your stratification methods were poor. Sarracenia seeds need decent stratification otherwise you'll be lucky to get 5% germination.

    5 weeks in the fridge is good and the seeds need to be wet. A slightly damp paper towel won't cut it.

  6. #14
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Well you might be able to still cold stratify them in the pots. Many people stratify them in pots either in the refrigerator or naturally outdoors, given the proper climate for it.

    Inspect the seeds for any fungus or mold. If ok, make sure the medium is damp/moist zip 'em up in plastic bags. Make sure there is some air in the bags and pop them into the refrigerator for at least 4 weeks.

    And yes, slightly damp paper towels work as the pots of S. alata, S. flava, and S. rubra seedlings I have under 24/7 lighting will attest.

    I took a paper towel for each species and placed the seeds in the middle and folded it over 4 times. I then misted the towels on both sides until they were slightly wet then pressed down gently with the flats of my fingers to make sure the water was soak through. I then patted these between dry paper towels until they were dry enough not to leave a noticable stain on dry newsprint when left there for a few seconds. These were placed in individual plastic zip lock bags into the refrigerator for 4 weeks.

    The other 4 Sarracenia species/ sub-species I stratified in live Sphagnum or New Zealand LFS. Oddly enough the only one that had no germinations was the S. purpurea ssp. venosa which I stratified for 5 weeks on wet NZ LFS. The others I squeezed out the Sphagnum or LFS to the point that it would only leave a mark on dry newsprint when pressed gently.

    What works for some people may not work for you. You just have to find what works for you. As long as you stay with in certain parameters you should do okay. Finding the sweet spot that yields the best results for you may take some time.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

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