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Thread: Cephs in high temperatures year round - Anyone?

  1. #1
    Moderator Cindy's Avatar
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    Cephs in high temperatures year round - Anyone?

    Anyone who grows your Cephs in hot conditons year round?

    Here is what I observed from growers who started with the cultivation at the same time with TC plants. I live in Singapore with year round temperatures between 75degF and 92degF.

    1. Cephs in cooler conditions tend to produce larger pitchers and the pitchers mature earlier. The plants look more sparse since most of the time, they are only made up of a single stem. Cooler temperatures can come in the form of air-conditioning at night or air-conditioning for the entire day.

    2. Cephs in uniformly hotter conditions i.e. hot during day as well as night, tend to produce multiple offshoots, resulting in a large clump of smaller pitchers.

    I noticed that humidity doesn't play a part in the size of the pitchers since the growers who keep them in air-conditioning do not have them covered or in a terrarium.

    Please share your experiences. Thanks!

    Btw, why do Cephs turn red? I have got plants side by side in different pots...one pot has got red pitchers but not the other. The plants are of the same age.
    Cindy

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    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    If they aren't getting the same light, then it's the genetics.

    Mine is in conditions of 70 at night, 80 tops (usually mid 70's) in the day. 50% covered terrarium, so humidity at the bottom is 70-80% above the water (so it's probably less where the cephalotus is since it's in a tall clay pot.)

    I never had a problem with them in lowland conditions, although some say I should have. I do find it's doing way better without the high temps, though.

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    From what I understand, Cephs grow in a more temeprate climate, seeing more seasonal change. I had mine growing on an unheated window sill, where they saw temps in the 40's F and into the 80's.

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    Kung Fu Fighting! NeciFiX's Avatar
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    Well, when mine had the humidity dome (recently tossed off) it was probably 75-80F. Now without it they are getting more light since the plastic isn't in the way and they seem to be fine with the 50% or so humidity, we do have an air conditioner, on top of this the warm sun isn't basking on them anymore, so during the day it should be around 70F, and during the night around 60F. However, they've always been relatively cool, when I received my Cephalotus I noticed it had just started making mature pitchers. Since it's arrival it has made a second growth point (I've probably had my Ceph for around half a year), and it has been jumping in pitcher size. Recently it's put out a mature pitcher on it's second growth point a lot chubbier and slightly taller with a more pronounced peristome than the other mature pitchers.

    And about the light thing, well, yeah genetics but you'd be surprised how much 6 inches away can make in light, you may not think much but it sometimes can be depending on the angle of the sun.

    I grow mine in relatively nice and cozy warm conditions during the day and cool during the night.

    (I first registered my Paypal account on January 3rd, 2007, when I first started ordering CPs, so I've been growing nearly 7.5 months).

    Edit: Upon reading my Paypal logs, I paid for my Cephalotus among others on March 8th... then I received them probably around March 10th-11th since I remember him sending them out that week. So, I've been growing Cephalotus for just over 5 months .
    - NeciFiX

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    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    You call 70 degrees warm and cozy?

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    Kung Fu Fighting! NeciFiX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustLikeAPill View Post
    You call 70 degrees warm and cozy?
    When you live in Wisconsin yes. Plus I said around 70 degrees, gosh, I always look stupid when I post...
    - NeciFiX

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    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    You should come to Georgia for a little while and learn the true meaning of "warm". 103 degree weather with EIGHTY AND ABOVE RELATIVE HUMIDITY!!!!! Walk outside and you'll have a stroke. Swear to God! The Sarracenia can't get enough of this weather, luckily for me

    It's neat that you mention how big of a difference 6 inches in light can make.

    Before:



    After lowering the light just five inches and adding mylar. The mylar was so very recently added that it didn't really affect the color at all, but I figured I'd add that since it was technically a variable change. Now it's darker than this old picture.




    I need to make cuttings. Baby hummers make excellent trading material. In fact, I think I'll do that now.

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    Kung Fu Fighting! NeciFiX's Avatar
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    PM'd lol.

    Yeah, you have quite the Hummer! I also noticed that the baby pitchers stay on for a LONG time! My Cephalotus has stopped making baby pitchers for months now, even before I got it it stopped! So it's been a half a year or more and some adult pitchers die after 2-3 months but the babies stay. It's kinda weird. Typically only 2 mature pitchers my Ceph had at arrival have died but still. My Cephalotus doesn't have a clump yet but maybe I could root a baby pitcher cutting? Dunno. It has a bunch of pitchers developing like tiny balls at really long petioles. Maybe to get out of the mature pitchers that are in the way? All of them are in the way.

    Edit: One mature pitcher that is on my Cephalotus that opened a few weeks after arrival is nearly 3x smaller than the newest chubbier pitcher. Yikes! Talk about jump in size.
    - NeciFiX

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