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Thread: Frogs in Pitcher Plant

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    Frogs in Pitcher Plant

    I was out enjoying my bog garden tonight, and noticed a little frog peeking out of one of my pitcher plants -- this one is Sarracenia "Dana's Delight", a named cultivar. So I got out my camera and took a few photos. There were actually three little frogs -- each about 1.5 cm in length -- inside the trumpet. They were fully capable of scaling the waxy inside walls.

    Seems like a nicely symbiotic relationship -- the plant provided shelter from predators and the hot sun, and attracted insects for the frogs to eat. The frogs, in turn excreted nitogen-rich waste which is a lot easier for the plants to absorb.





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    War. War never changes. Est's Avatar
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    Very cool. I have experienced something similar a few times this growing season. How the frogs continually get on my 2nd story balcony will remain a mystery.

    Good job getting in close for a good shot without scaring off your subject!
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    Think the ICPS newsletter might publish them?
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    I've got a magic window! elgecko's Avatar
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    Great shots!


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    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SarraceniaScott View Post
    Think the ICPS newsletter might publish them?
    Why not? Just remember they prefer images submitted on slide film or very high quality digital images. Normally they want an article to go along with the images. Check with Barry first.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Not a Number View Post
    Why not? Just remember they prefer images submitted on slide film or very high quality digital images. Normally they want an article to go along with the images. Check with Barry first.

    Shot with a Canon EOS 20D -- 8.3 megapixel. Should be high enough quality.
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    cute little buggers. i wish we had climbing frogs in minnesota. we mostly have toads and bullfrogs...
    if i were ruler of the world, anyone who defined a nepenthene as a "companion plant" to orchids would be fired from a cannon atop mt. kinabalu.

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    Moderator Alexis's Avatar
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    Seems like a nicely symbiotic relationship -- the plant provided shelter from predators and the hot sun, and attracted insects for the frogs to eat. The frogs, in turn excreted nitogen-rich waste which is a lot easier for the plants to absorb.
    There's always the chance that the frog might slip into the pitcher too!

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