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Thread: Flowering Saracennia

  1. #9
    Alien1099's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Not a Number View Post
    Obviously you've never purchased a bale of compressed peat moss, which can be quite hard and dry. The smaller bags often have a wetting agent added (i.e. soap). Soaking for a day or two as well as rinsing well is a very good idea either way.

    Can you even get peat moss in the UK now? I thought the EU was banning peat usage.
    Actually I have a 2.2 cubic foot bag of Premier Canadian Peat Moss that I picked up from Lowes.

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    Moderator Alexis's Avatar
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    Hi

    If you want to repot, use either 100% sphagnum moss peat, or a 50:50 mix of moss peaterlite.

    Your flower could end up red, yellow, orange or pink! Looking at your picture, I'd hazard a wil guess at it looking something like one of the orangey pink flowers on here: http://www.pj-plants.co.uk/SarraceniaFlowerGallery.htm

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    Noob purple_monkfi's Avatar
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    Yeah, I'm thinking red or orange given the leaves/pitchers turn such a brilliant red as they mature. It's sad, because it's still wintery most of the leaves are still green, ahh well. Soon enough the sun will come out and my poor little plant can blush once more. Might do it some good, poor overcrowded thing.

    Does overcrowding pose a problem in the short term? The poor plant is still in the pot it came in which is a rather small plastic number, now the pitchers have gotten so large it's scrunched for space and occassionally we get rather deformed traps, though it's a rare occurance. I can make out what look like several growth points as the plant is getting massive. Should I make repotting a priority or will it be alright all scrunched up for a little while?

    I'll be keeping an eye out for pearlite and peat and all those things. Anyone reccomend any particular british gardening stores? Also, what sort of water tray? Shall I get a pot within a pot or some similar arrangement or is there some better arrangement? currently it's sat in a bowl, yes a bowl. Not exactly the most tidy of states but it works. A larger pot however will require either a larger bowl or simply another larger shallower pot or tray to put the whole thing into. So glazed pottery is ok? I'm paranoid about killing this poor thing after it's not only lived but thrived under my amature and clueless hand oops.

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    cpjungle72's Avatar
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    Hi purple monkfi, you should go ahead, and repot it into a larger container. As late winter, and early spring are the best times to repot. Glazed pottery well work great. Just remember that the larger the pot the better. Saracennia love to have lots of room to spread there roots into. A good mix of 50/50 peat, and perlite will work great. Just make sure it is free of any fertilizers. When mixing the peat/perlite, I find it much easer to mix when both ingredients are still dry. Then after it is mixed well you can add distilled water, and continue mixing until it is saturated. For me it seems to soak up the water better by doing it this way. After removing the plant from it's old container, I like to dunk the root ball in a bucket of water, and wash away as much of the old soil as possible before repotting.
    Good luck.

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    Moderator Alexis's Avatar
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    Yeah, I'm thinking red or orange given the leaves/pitchers turn such a brilliant red as they mature.
    Flower colour is related to the species - for example all red flavas and all green ones both have bright yellow flowers.

    Your plant is a hybrid, with purpurea (red flowers), minor (yellow) and maybe some rubra (red) in there too. So orangey red flowers are likely.

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