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Thread: Heliamphora, Darlingtonia soil problem

  1. #9
    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    I find that an established plant can tolerate much. Mine was unfazed at 3 consecutive days in the 90's.

    A mix of sand and peat, with a healthy layer of LFS works well.


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    A yellow M&M Jefforever's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Clint;886519]I used pure perlite,[QUOTE]

    Wow, really? I've never heard of any heli growers using only perlite. Sounds very logical though. I'll try that out!

    Maybe APS would work too? I got some of that lying around.

  3. #11
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    Did I say that? dude, totally meant pure LFS. I don't know why I said that.

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    A yellow M&M Jefforever's Avatar
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    Lol. What would happen if you used pure perlite? Hmm...

    Oh yeah - some people use 100% cypress mulch. Sounds like it works well too.

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    ilbasso's Avatar
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    My cobra is in something like 2:1 perlite/LFS with possibly some bark and peat tossed it. Clearly, I didn't put too much thought into it. I have recently been pouring the water from its saucer over the soil whenever I'm out in the garden but that's about it. I do have it positioned behind a larger planter for shading the pot. I was fairly sure it was a goner but it is growing once again so I'm just hoping for the best.

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    Av8tor1's Avatar
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    6p cypress bark
    3p LFS
    1p charcoal

    FWIW, you can ask 100 people and get almost 100 different mixes...

    A good mix holds air like a balloon, holds water like a sponge, and drains like a sieve (sp?)

    IMHO it helps if it contains a blend of items for trace and micro nutrient purposes. Personally, I prefer the more "complicated" blends that also breaks down slowly

    Av

  7. #15
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    .....What does LFS, charcoal, and cypress bark release?

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    Av8tor1's Avatar
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    Clint, without analytical chromatography (proper nomenclature?) the only answer I can honestly give to that is "more than any one component by itself". IMHO by adding additional soil components, the chances are that a more complete range of micro and trace nutrients are made available to the plant. Now the benefit of this will vary greatly to not only the genus, but even to a specific species within a genus.... but since we are discussing helis at the moment, here is a little peer reviewed research on the subject.

    Uptake of some mineral ions was estimated in Heliamphora tatei and H. heterodoxa, by measuring the disappearance of ions from a solution (in mM: KCl, 1; CaCl2, 1; MgCl2, 1; NaCl, 1; NaH2PO4, 0.5; NH4Cl, 18.7) poured into their pitcher leaves (Jaffe et al., 1992). During 24 hours, 92-98 % of added P, 66-67 % of K, 28-54 % of Na, 9-30 % of Ca, and 18-32 % of Mg was taken up by the leaves. The former species took up all ions more efficiently than the latter. The results show that the species is able to take up P and K more efficiently from prey, than Na, Ca, and Mg.


    In cephs this becomes even more true, only 60% of it's nutrient ions come from captured prey... and the rest from the roots. IMHO this is another benefit of using Trichoderma
    Cephs can and do grow very fast under ideal conditions. (Butch Tincher, 2008 LOL)

    excellent ref on the subject:
    Adamec L., 1997. Mineral nutrition of carnivorous plants: A review. Bot. Rev. 63: 273-299.

    Institute of Botany of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Section of Plant Ecology, Dukelská 145, CZ-379 82 Třeboň, Czech Republic

    HTH's
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