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Thread: Couple questions about Cephalotus

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    Agent of Chaos Wolfn's Avatar
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    Couple questions about Cephalotus

    Couple of questions about Cephalotus.

    1) Is it a difficult plant to grow?

    2) How much light do they need?

    3) Do they grow year round without any dormancy requirments?

    4) How big should the pot be?

    5) I heard that they are very slow growing. Exactly how slow are we talking?

    6) Grown from seed, how long do they take to reach maturity?



    I'm considering buying a Cephalotus because I want a small and compact pitcher plant that I can grow year round. Nepenthes are nice, but the traps get a little too big for me and their stems eventually outgrow my growing space. Therefore, I've become particually attracted to the Cephalotus.
    "I may be on the side of angels, but do not mistake me for one."

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    Doing it wrong until I do it right. xvart's Avatar
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    http://www.terraforums.com/forums/se...earchid=119259

    Quote Originally Posted by Ahmad View Post
    Nepenthes are nice, but the traps get a little too big for me and their stems eventually outgrow my growing space.
    That's when you take cuttings to trade around!

    xvart.
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    D_muscipula's Avatar
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    1) It can be difficult.
    2) I have no clue.
    3) They need a brief winter dormancy, usually less light is enough so reduce the photoperiod and maybe give a bit cooler temperatures for a few months.
    4) WAY TOO BIG for the size of the plant. Like a 6-8 inch pot for a 3 inch plant, and hey when it gets older you can use the same pot XD.
    5) I have no clue but it can't be as slow as nepenthes lowii. Or can it?
    6) Let's be honest, I have no idea.

    You might find this link useful.
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    mark.ca's Avatar
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    do a forum search and read all the info you find...all your answers are there!
    Best regards,
    Marius

    My Website: http://droseragemmae.com/

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    BigBella's Avatar
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    The plant is remarkably simple to grow, provided you don't do what a number of growers tend to do: cook them. I have found that Cephalotus are remarkably resilient provided some thought is given to their Tb well-being. Most of my plants grow in the high sixties to seventies range and are not allowed to soar into the triple-digits on too many occasions. Also, I prefer to grow them in about 40-50% shade for optimal plant / pitcher size, and then to expose them to more light in September or October (in North America) to get a bit of color . . .

    There is still some disagreement about Cephalotus dormancy requirements. I believe that they do experience a definite slow-down in winter though remain evergreen. The confusion probably stems from a popular habit in cultivation of providing constant Tb and artificial light throughout the year. The plants don't get to experience dormancy, since their photoperiods are not observed . . .

    Cephalotus can produce remarkably-long rhizomes and roots so a deeper pot would be preferred, though I've had experiences in the past with the rhizome emerging from a drainage hole and forming a plant alongside the original pot. Shallower, wider pots often allow for more offshoots to form; though a deeper pot may quell some fears about using the tray method for watering, and the increased amount of compost will keep the Tb down. While not as potentially touchy about the warming of the roots as Darlingtonia and Heliamphora, it should still be a mild concern . . .

    As far as how fast Cephalotus grows, it depends on specific cultivation, that particular clone, and the plant's own attitude. Below, I have a couple of shots of a "German Giant" that I've had since 2004. It is one of the single most frustrating plants I've ever had. Other Cephalotus have grown to flowering maturity from minute leaf-cuttings beside this one.





    Seed-grown plants can take upwards of ten years to mature; so say some who have a penchant for growing them that way. Sometimes it may take over a year for a seed to even germinate!




    Quote Originally Posted by Ahmad View Post
    Couple of questions about Cephalotus.

    1) Is it a difficult plant to grow?

    2) How much light do they need?

    3) Do they grow year round without any dormancy requirments?

    4) How big should the pot be?

    5) I heard that they are very slow growing. Exactly how slow are we talking?

    6) Grown from seed, how long do they take to reach maturity?



    I'm considering buying a Cephalotus because I want a small and compact pitcher plant that I can grow year round. Nepenthes are nice, but the traps get a little too big for me and their stems eventually outgrow my growing space. Therefore, I've become particually attracted to the Cephalotus.
    Last edited by BigBella; 07-05-2008 at 10:43 AM. Reason: typing with boxing gloves and a splinter . . .
    “Sì perché l'autorità dell'opinione di mille nelle scienze non val per una scintilla di ragione di un solo . . ."

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    Agent of Chaos Wolfn's Avatar
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    I've been thinking of growing a Cephalotus in a 4-inch wide/6-inch deep plastic pot under a florescent lamp like this:




    Would this work?





    .
    "I may be on the side of angels, but do not mistake me for one."

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    Doing it wrong until I do it right. xvart's Avatar
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    You'd be better by a window, in my opinion.

    xvart.
    "The tragedy of life is not that every man loses; but that he almost wins."

    "Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?"

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    Katherine
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    I find this plant remarkably easy to grow, and my 2 plants of this are the best looking carnivorous plants I've grown so far. My adultish one, which I've had for 4 months, has 6 growing points, 3 of which it's made since I got it, and yesterday when I counted, it had 18 pitchers of various sizes. It is, as yet, still a single plant though.

    I'll try to describe the conditions mine are growing in.

    They are on a North facing windowsill (equivalent to a south facing in USA), which gets full, direct light. There is no 'diffusion' not even by trees, hedges etc. outside. It is full, pure light, as in enough light to make Sarracenia go from green, to bright red within a week.
    The whole windosill is enshrouded with a net curtain, which I think does something for humidity. I cannot say what the humidity is, except that it is high enough to grow Sarr's and Venus fly Trap's succesfully.
    The plant perhaps gets more water than it should, because I have to entrust my nana to water it. It is a large plant though, which may be why. I would not trust my smaller plant with the same amount of water. The plant never sits in water, but it is watered every day or every second day, depending on how hot it is. It just gets normal tap water. The top-soil dries out between watering, which is usually two days at most, but the soil below always satays cool and moist.
    The temperature is anything from 18-32 degrees during the day, with no ill effects, and anything from 15-24 degrees at night, depending on the season.

    I must warn you though, I purchased my plant from a person who goes out of their way to make their plants TOUGH. This person takes there Sarr's down to an apline village here in NZ for their first dormancy, to harden them with temps well below zero, with frost and snow, so I would not be surprised if my Ceph is hardier than many pampered, well-cared for ceph's!

    Hope that helps..
    Drosera Arcturi-The Alpine Sundew...

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