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Thread: My Pitcher Plant

  1. #1

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    My Pitcher Plant

    Ok so my dad was helping me put it in the terrarium and he didn't know that there was liquid in the pitchers and he turned it up side down to get it out of its pot and into the terrarium and out went all the liquid. I'm worried that It'll die now, will it be fine and just make more?

  2. #2

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    If this is an American Pitcher Plant, or a member of the Sarracenia genus, it will be just fine without water in its pitchers. Just make sure to follow the basic guidlines; a proper media (generally peat or sphagnum based), large amounts of light, purified water, and a temperate climate.

    For a more detailed approach to growing Sarracenia sp., see this thread : http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...ad.php?t=84153

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    Thanks, I think I live in Zone 15 or 16 but I have it indoors in a terrarium with regular potting soil without any acid with a UV lamp and am using distilled water to water it. And am going to catch flies and let them loose in the terrarium so my plant can feed. Are these conditions going to be fine? Oh and it is a Sarracenia.

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    Are you sure you mean Zone 15? the highest the USDA hardiness zone map goes up to is 11, which would mean you live in a very tropical area. If this is the case, you would grow the plant outdoors part of the year while bringing it inside for the remainder to go dormant.

    Growing Sarracenia in terrariums is more difficult than growing them outdoors ,but not impossible with shorter species and hybrids. From what I've heard, high light levels are the key. As I've only ever grown them outdoors, I'm sure other forum users could be more help here than I.

    As for feeding, I recommend frezzing the flies or somesuch first and then popping them into the pitchers to prevent the flies from escaping. While it may be more entertaining to watch the plant entrap an insect on its own devices, it is far more convienent to use "pre-killed" insects.

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    Oh well then im not quite sure what zone I am in then. I live in Northern California and it is very dry where I live and I heard that these plants like to have humidity. And the winters get into the 30s and 20s in the winter, I'm not sure if that is fine for them. So its alright if I catch a fly, kill it, and just pop it into the pitcher? And am i fine with my soil in the terrarium? Thanks very much for your answers.

  6. #6
    feedme's Avatar
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    I live in zone 15 as well. It is extreme desert conditions. Summer highs 125-130F, 2-4 inches of rain per year, winter highs in the 50's down to 40's at night.
    Feed me Seymour.

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    you need to use peat for the potting media, even regular potting soil still has some neutrients in minerals in it that will kill the plant, remember these plants grow in bogs with little to no neutrients in the soil, The plant must only be watered with RO, Rain, or Distilled Water, never tap water as the salt and mineral content will kill the plant. I dont know where you live, but if you provided us with better information, we could help you out...The USDA map only shows to zone 11, i dont know where this "zone 15" stuff is coming from either....Sarracenia need to be grown in full sun, so if you cannot grow it outside because of the insane heat, maybe you should stick with indoor CPs like Pings, Drosera, Nepenthes, Heliamphora, Utricularia, etc. Also Sarras, VFTs, and some temperate Drosera and Pinguicula need a winter dormancy, so unless you can strap multiple T5 lights above a growrack in a garage or something, you might be SOL as far growing Sarras....if it really gets that hot outside in the summer.

    Edit: Also, i have never seen an extremely dry hot part of Northern California.........what part are you talking about?!
    i highly recommend picking up a copy of Peter D' Amato's book titled "The Savage Garden"

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