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Thread: Looking for feedback on couple things

  1. #1

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    Looking for feedback on couple things

    Well as we enter June I'm starting to ask myself more and more questions from the looks of my S. leucophylla and S. leucophylla 'Tarnok'.

    I know that abnormal growth is normal in the beginning of the growing season but now that we are entering June and the temps are constantly in the mid 70s during the day and mid 50s at night I figured this abnormal growth would have seized. I've asked myself if maybe the peat needs replaced, but here is a list of the factors i'm considering.

    - Medium consists of Peat moss and perlite, less then 1 yr old, sat in water/ice all winter
    - There is no 'burnt' look to the peat
    - Water is strictly rain water
    - No pest issues such as aphids, scales, spider mites or anything
    - The rest of the plants in the same bog are doing fine, (Catesbaei, Wriggleyana, VFTs, filiformis filiformis.
    - A flava cannot develop normal pitchers either, leading me to believe a late start in the growing season?

    Looking at the above signs nothing leads me to believe that my soil needs changed but then the pitchers are still looking very abnormal. I know that phylodia are very common early on but I wouldnt say that it's early on anymore as my other leucophylla is opening just fine.

    This pitcher unrolled like a D. filiformis leaf, you can see in the background the other pitcher did a complete 360 as it was growing.




    The leaves that did develop into pitchers rather then phyllodia all began to get a burnt/dried out look prior to opening even though the water level is about 1/2 way up the pot and after heavy rain can be around 3/4 of the way up. Roots in the wild can be completely saturated so I assume that this should not have affected the plant either.

    I trimmed the top of the dried pitcher but here is a close up of what the entire thing looked like:




    Here is a wider shot of the plant, there are more pitchers developing but the pitcher openings 'to be' seem a bit small for the size of the leaf.





    I'd like to get some input and suggestions from the pros out there and thoughts from anyone out there. My current assumption is that this season has been slow to start and that they will eventually 'straighten out'.

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    cp-connection's Avatar
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    My tarnok make goofy leaves when they've had a hard winter. Usually when a leaf wilts early in the spring that growth point will die. I attribute that to death by fungus brought on by stress ( I actually had some plant material tested by the Dept of Ag. one year). Yours will grow out of it by summer. Just let it be.

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    RL7836's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by F R e N c H 3 z View Post
    Here is a wider shot of the plant, there are more pitchers developing but the pitcher openings 'to be' seem a bit small for the size of the leaf.
    Depending on the year, some of my leucos don't even pitcher in the spring - just throw out phyllodia or the pitchers w/ the tiny top opening. No worries - let them grow ...
    All the best,
    Ron
    You must do the thing you think you cannot do. --- Eleanor Roosevelt

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    Aklys joossa's Avatar
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    I'd say that if the plants in the same pot are healthy and your leucos are sending up green growth (in whaterever form it may be), then it's most likely that the leucos are healthy. They just need time.


    Just wait until Autumn....
    -Joel from Southern California


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    BigBella's Avatar
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    I too get a few screwy leaves at the beginning of the season and have a few now. Things will get ironed out by summer . . .
    “Sì perché l'autorità dell'opinione di mille nelle scienze non val per una scintilla di ragione di un solo . . ."

    -- Galileo "Biff" Galilei

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    i have a theory that insects may feed on the developing pitchers in early spring, when htere's not much else to feed on. i think sucking-type insects, not leaf-eating ones. anyway, those type of insects would not show evidence immediately, but as the pitcher continues to develop, it becomes warped and misshapen. i get a lot of this too on my first pitchers of the year, especially S. oreophila for some reason. man, they're ugly right now. as I said, this is just a theory and i have yet to see any insects to back that theory up. could just be the effects of the long, cold winters where I live

  7. #7

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    Thanks for the feedback everyone.
    What was throwing me off was that 1 leuco is doing fine but the other is wacked up. Guess it's just mother nature messing with them for now. Cant wait to see some nice pitchers this summer... came from a great grower

    But while this is up, when do you know it's time to change your peat? And are there any alternative to peat? I know there's choir (spl?) and coco peat but I know there's lots of Sodium and potassium in those which would make a real pain to clean prior to using it.

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    BigBella's Avatar
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    Stick with various long fiber sphagnum, sphagnum peat, horticultural sand, and perlite mixtures. The coir composts are suitable for some Nepenthes but the sodium content of some coir (apparently harvested near beaches) is just off the charts and could prove disastrous to your plants. Sarracenia require little in the way of creativity with their composts; just provide some low pH and drainage . . .
    “Sì perché l'autorità dell'opinione di mille nelle scienze non val per una scintilla di ragione di un solo . . ."

    -- Galileo "Biff" Galilei

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