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Thread: When is the best season to repot Sarracenia?

  1. #9

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    These ones that do not produce seeds I pollinated by myself.
    Is self pollination a wrong way to rpoduce seeds or has a time to pollination?
    The others species no need to pollination to rpoduce seeds. Maybe the bees do it.

  2. #10

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    Self pollination is more difficult to do and requires multiple attempts. Even if the pollination is successful the number of viable seeds will be much less then a cross pollination. If you are trying to get pure crosses (i.e. purp ssp. purp X purp ssp. purp) it will be easier for pollination to work using 2 different plants that are not genetically identical to each other, i.e. that are not divisions from one another. If you still would like to try to self pollinate multiple attempts will have to be made (usually 3-5) on each stigma.

    Also the stigma becomes receptive prior to pollen being released. Once the pollen is released you will still be able to try a self pollination but you will have less time (just a couple days less) to do so. You can let the bees do the work for you but then there is no telling what you may end up with.

  3. #11

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    Hi FReNcH3z!
    You wrote that the stigam became receptive prior to pollen being released. Do you know at what time the stigam became receptive?
    You are help me a lot with these informations.

  4. #12
    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcos Ono View Post
    I will try to identify the fungus.
    I have heard 2 IDs for the fungus that causes rhizome melt. Fussarium and Cylindrocladium. The ID on one of these is second hand but from a source I trust and the other is from a person whose credibility is questionable at times but his account of his collections destruction at the hands of fungus is quite detailed.

    Which ever it is there are a few of us growers that are becoming more and more convinced that it is probably a lot more common than most would initially assume. Growers in more northern areas do not see it much but it seems to be almost endemic in the South here in the US. The major trigger for this pest is heat, especially at night. It also seems to be encourages by using the tray method. I am almost certain that the hot, stagnant water provides the perfect conditions for the fungus. Around here (Atlanta, GA) the incidence rates begin to rise when night temps start staying above 25C or so and will spike rapidly when nights are above 28C. Daytime temps over 36C seem to prime conditions as well. Something I personally have noticed (but have not tracked among others) is that a media of peat/sand also seems to encourage growth of the fungus. Small pots also encourage it (media in smaller pots heats faster.)

    Once a plant is showing symptoms it pretty much done for. I have saved a few plants but it was extremely difficult and they have never grown well after the recovery effort. If a plant is showing symptoms then the best thing to do is isolate it to prevent spread to other plants in your collection.

    Plants with dense/compact growth (purpurea) are quite susceptible as is minor (minor has a predilection for drier conditions in cultivation and most people grow it too wet for its liking.)



    The best way to curb the incidence rate of this disease, at least for me, has been the following:

    -Pure peat as a media.
    -If you are growing in pots, use larger pots (4L or more)
    -Top water only with no tray.
    -Preferably, grow in micro-bogs or full bog gardens
    -I am not going to swear it will work for everyone but for me the use of a beneficial biological has helped. I use one by CustomBio that is a 9 species mix.
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

    See You Space Cowboy

    actagggcagtgatatcccattggtacatggcaaattagcctcatgat
    Hagerstown, Maryland

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  5. #13

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    Nice advice!
    Do you know how to control this fungus? I have using Captan(Orthocid) but no success.
    CustonBio ? We have not this here.
    Thanks a lot!

  6. #14
    N=R* fs fp ne fl fi fc L Pyro's Avatar
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    I do not know of any control for it, it seems to be resistant to most every fungicide out there. Prevention is better than cure in this case. Consider trying the methods I have outlined. I can not swear they will work but they may help.

    See if you can find any type of beneficial/symbiotic organism, it need not be CustomBio. RootShield, Trichoderma... something like that may help. And make sure it is fresh
    'My love was science- specifically biology and, more specifically, when placed in a common jar, which of two organisms would devour the other.'

    See You Space Cowboy

    actagggcagtgatatcccattggtacatggcaaattagcctcatgat
    Hagerstown, Maryland

    --
    actagggcagtgatatcccattggtacatggcaaattagcctcatgat

  7. #15

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    Thanks again Pyro!
    I will look for.

  8. #16

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    HI Marcos, I'm not exactly sure when the stigma becomes receptive but this usually happens 1-2 days after the flower opens for me. You can pollinate the flower prior to the pollen being released and have a successful pollination. The flower will still release it's own pollen but the petals will wilt much sooner then normal in these cases.

    What Pyro said is spot on. Fussarium will definitely ravage collections. I have used trichorderma on all my bogs but I cannot give you any results as I have done to control experiments. I just know that I have had no negative side effects and from the voices of other growers it can be beneficial though some question it. At the very least it cant hurt to have it. I use the T-22 strain Trichoderma in my bogs and some of my pots.

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