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Thread: Darlingtonia: How to tell if I have mountain or coastal?

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    sea bear returns! theyellowdart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcantrell View Post
    Now I'm confused. Which one is the one that dies if you sneeze too loudly around it?

    (Costal's the easier one to raise, right? The one that's not expecting 50 degree roots all the time?)
    Nope, you have it backwards. Mountain is the easier one.
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    Has anyone really been far even as decided to use even go want to do look more like?

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    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    If it isn't labeled in regards to location or coming from a mountain population then there is no way to distinguish between populations. Unless you have anthocyanin free plant (yellow flowers) aka Darlingtonia 'Othello' which are only found in one site in the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

    Technically the groups from the coastal and mountain regions do not qualify as varieties or forms. See BobZ's post on this subject on the ICPS board:

    http://icps.proboards.com/index.cgi?...5&page=1#18448

    Quote Originally Posted by theyellowdart View Post
    Nope, you have it backwards. Mountain is the easier one.
    That's somewhat of a bold statement to make. From what gets passed around on the boards it appears the mountain populations are more tolerant of temperature extremes and are more vigorous growers. It is altogether possible that the mountain populations have a colder dormancy requirement and in the long run (4-5 years+) may be more difficult to grow if you cannot provide them with cold enough winters. Barry Rice acknowledges this even though there are no known studies in this reqards.

    If you aree unable to provide root cooling or a significant nightly temperature drop and a cold dormancy you are probably going to find it difficult to grow any Darlingtonia.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

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    Tropical Fish Enthusiast jimscott's Avatar
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    Can you tell which this is?


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    For comparisons sake...

    Coastal Form





    Mountain Form







    As far as I can see the only difference is the coastal form is much more colorfull than the mountain form in most cases.
    Max

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    sea bear returns! theyellowdart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Not a Number View Post
    That's somewhat of a bold statement to make. From what gets passed around on the boards it appears the mountain populations are more tolerant of temperature extremes and are more vigorous growers. It is altogether possible that the mountain populations have a colder dormancy requirement and in the long run (4-5 years+) may be more difficult to grow if you cannot provide them with cold enough winters. Barry Rice acknowledges this even though there are no known studies in this reqards.

    If you aree unable to provide root cooling or a significant nightly temperature drop and a cold dormancy you are probably going to find it difficult to grow any Darlingtonia.
    I was just going under the normal belief that the mountain variety tends to be the more vigorous and tolerant one.
    I was being general about it since most people would have said the same thing.
    growlist

    Has anyone really been far even as decided to use even go want to do look more like?

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    The alpine variety of Darlingtonia does see greater temperature extremes just due to its specific environment, and may prove to be more vigorous for some growers when kept in more arid locales; whether either form differs in color is more due to exposure than any differences between the plants. I have Darlingtonia whose source was the Western Sierra in California and those from coastal Oregon; and, aside from a time lag of a couple of weeks in the arrival of Spring growth of the alpine form, there is no way to tell . . .
    “Sì perché l'autorità dell'opinione di mille nelle scienze non val per una scintilla di ragione di un solo . . ."

    -- Galileo "Biff" Galilei

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    My worry is over the next 3 months, as daytime temperatures hit 95-105, coming home to see a rapidly declining Darlingtonia on my porch...



    I keep them in deep saucers topped off (although I do try to let them dry out between waterings to avoid root rot) and have the Darlingtonia in pure LFS, so... we'll see.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mcantrell View Post
    My worry is over the next 3 months, as daytime temperatures hit 95-105, coming home to see a rapidly declining Darlingtonia on my porch...

    I keep them in deep saucers topped off (although I do try to let them dry out between waterings to avoid root rot) and have the Darlingtonia in pure LFS, so... we'll see.

    I keep my Darlingtonia in unglazed terracotta pots and in constantly-flooded trays -- and never allow them to dry out between watering. I would suggest the same watering method, considering the high Summer Tbs . . .
    “Sì perché l'autorità dell'opinione di mille nelle scienze non val per una scintilla di ragione di un solo . . ."

    -- Galileo "Biff" Galilei

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