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Thread: Never knew, or even heard of this

  1. #9

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    We grow all of our Sarrs on benches 22 inches off the ground. We allow them to dry out (potting mix is moist, not wet) between waterings. One well known grower visiting us exclaimed the first time he saw our plants, "You know, they are bog plants!". Well, not at Sunbelle! We have eliminated water trays, which seem to promote rhizome rot, which spreads rampantly through a group of plants sitting in a stagnant tray of water.
    Our potting media is simple: sphagnum peat and Phar-rock (sp?) sponge rock. No sand. Sand contributes to anaerobic conditions. Good drainage and growing on the dry side contributes to less disease and healthy, tougher plants. This is what works for us.

  2. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by awgaupp View Post
    OK. well, i consider all soil(even from the ground around my house) potting soil.
    well, i guess technically speaking, if it's soil that you put in a pot, you can call it potting soil.

  3. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trent View Post
    We grow all of our Sarrs on benches 22 inches off the ground. We allow them to dry out (potting mix is moist, not wet) between waterings. One well known grower visiting us exclaimed the first time he saw our plants, "You know, they are bog plants!". Well, not at Sunbelle! We have eliminated water trays, which seem to promote rhizome rot, which spreads rampantly through a group of plants sitting in a stagnant tray of water.
    Our potting media is simple: sphagnum peat and Phar-rock (sp?) sponge rock. No sand. Sand contributes to anaerobic conditions. Good drainage and growing on the dry side contributes to less disease and healthy, tougher plants. This is what works for us.
    Hi Trent - was just curious as to how often you water your plants and if you use drainage holes in your pots. Also, I'm assuming your humidity levels are pretty high, being down in FL. The reason I'm curious is that I'm in NW Wisc., and we're pretty much close to being classified as a severe drought region. I think our last measurable rainfall was over 2 weeks ago, and I'm barely keeping up with keeping my Sarras watered, as our humidity has been generally low this summer and it seems the water evaporates quicker than I can pour it. I have some large mini-bog type of planting and those seem unaffected, but i have some that are in pots, using the tray method and I found some of those wilting and drying out this past Friday, and I don't think the tray was empty for that long. I also have some seedlings that are in shallow trays with pure sphagnum and I'm finding myself watering them almost every day. Any my little under-the-sink R.O. unit only puts out about 5 gallons/day.

  4. #12
    Moderator Alexis's Avatar
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    Hi Trent

    When you talk about rhizome rot, is that more of a winter or a summer problem for you?

  5. #13
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    Another Florida grower here: I usually have problems with rot in the summer due to the excessive rains + tray.

    Right now I'm switching over from tray growing to big community pots. I just have too much trouble with Sarracenia when I let them sit in water.

  6. #14

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    Watering depends on the time of year. All of our pots have drainage holes. During dormancy, typically we water once or twice a week, depending on how much rain we get and relative humidity. Winter/spring is our dry season. As Jeremy indicated, most rot problems rear their ugly head in summer when humidity is high and rain is frequent, but rot may occur at any time. Michelle does a mid morning walk thru nearly every day, looking for potential problems. It is important to catch rot problems early on before it spreads through the whole plant.
    In spring, when temps are moderate, we are in the peak of our dry season, and the plants are just out of dormancy. Watering is daily.
    Our plants get either rain or RO water.
    We do not place sphagnum in/on our Sarracenia pots. We know it looks nice, but it is a major contributor to rot. Best to keep the rhizome as exposed to light and air as possible.Overall, it is important to avoid stagnant conditions.
    Hope this is helpful.

  7. #15
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    The Fusarium fungus is one known cause of rhizome rot. Fungus gnats are a vector in spreading this fungus. By keeping your media on the dry side you are keeping the fungus gnat population at bay. What happens if you put a mulch of sand (~1/2 inch) on top of your pots? This keeps the gnats out since they need wet decaying organic matter for their larvae.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  8. #16

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    Thanks for your tips, Trent.

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