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Thread: Why can't dormancy be 2 weeks?!?

  1. #9
    jimmy uphwiz's Avatar
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    how can you tell if its dead as they all look dead to me at this time of the year ,
    mine look very sorry right now even down to the media surface , I dont give up till spring and know for sure they are dead, most of the time not i am in a much colder area than you guys so i give a little more protection,
    ,. a little trouble but it keeps them from getting too much water i just check once a month add a little water if needed and keep them setting in 1 to 2 inches of water also , which stays frozen most of the time, ive not lost one sarr this way, only lost one , but that was in the summer , i let it dry out, bad bad bad ,me[COLOR="green"]
    Last edited by uphwiz; 12-16-2009 at 07:44 PM. Reason: double posted sorry

  2. #10
    "Oh, now he's a philosophizer" Baylorguy's Avatar
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    True, Texas has several different climates, but Houston and San Antonio are awfully close to east Texas in terms of climate. People in San Antonio always say it is dry, but that is a total joke. It is still very humid compared to say Amarillo.


    So what do the experienced growers do when going out of town for about a week? I am still trying to figure out what to do. Since it is winter maybe I can get away with watering it very well when I leave and counting on the roots to stay moist?

    Phil

    Quote Originally Posted by SpyCspider View Post
    eh...I had one small Sarracenia die already from being cold and wet in its outdoor minibog..the others look ok so far.

    As for being from Texas, I'm sure we agree our state is easily the size of 5 smaller ones and climate in east Texas (where Alatas grow naturally) or even Houston can be vastly different than San Antonio... although recently, they've been very similar...wet, cold, and depressing.

  3. #11
    Your one and only pest! Ant's Avatar
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    You could place a tarp over them so that it is more humid underneath and preventing faster drying.

  4. #12
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baylorguy View Post
    So what do the experienced growers do when going out of town for about a week?
    Uh... at the risk of sounding like a jerk, most experienced growers use trays and don't worry about it for absences as brief as a week. Honestly, once I get my plants into the appropriate trays for the season, I typically don't do a thing with them all winter until I get ready for repotting and such. They only need attention if there's some sort of accident, like branches getting blown down in a windstorm or critters tipping pots over. (Rarely happens these days, as I keep my outdoor plants screened in under chicken wire.)
    If I didn't grow my plants in standing water, I'd have to check on them daily for five to six months out of the year - maybe more. Even with very tall pots and deep trays, at the peak of the summer heat I can't go more than two or three days between waterings. I've got to wonder how you make a wooden planter work in San Antonio summers. I'm not sure I could give a puppy that much attention.
    ~Joe
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  5. #13
    "Oh, now he's a philosophizer" Baylorguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seedjar View Post
    Uh... at the risk of sounding like a jerk, most experienced growers use trays and don't worry about it for absences as brief as a week. Honestly, once I get my plants into the appropriate trays for the season, I typically don't do a thing with them all winter until I get ready for repotting and such. They only need attention if there's some sort of accident, like branches getting blown down in a windstorm or critters tipping pots over. (Rarely happens these days, as I keep my outdoor plants screened in under chicken wire.)
    If I didn't grow my plants in standing water, I'd have to check on them daily for five to six months out of the year - maybe more. Even with very tall pots and deep trays, at the peak of the summer heat I can't go more than two or three days between waterings. I've got to wonder how you make a wooden planter work in San Antonio summers. I'm not sure I could give a puppy that much attention.
    ~Joe
    Hi Joe -

    You jerk. just kidding

    My problem with the tray system has been finding one large enough for the wooden planter. It is not too wide but is definitely long. Plus my wife is worried about how it looks and doesn't want a weird looking tray You're right about San Antonio summers though... the highs get over 100 on a fairly regular basis. I suppose in this case I would top water daily, perhaps morning AND night. I think they should be fine on this system and I've heard of others growing their minibogs with just a consistent top water routine.

    I thought of another option... Though it is hard water, I do have a sprinkler system that I could activate one day of the week while I am gone for maybe 5 minutes. I think it would be a stretch to say that one watering would really set my plants back. What do you think?

    Phil

  6. #14
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    Honestly, I'd just recommend getting rid of the wooden planter. It probably won't last long with bog conditions, anyways - certainly not if you start keeping it in a tray. For the time being, you'll be fine, but I'd look into finding a replacement before the heat really starts to pick up.
    If appearance is a mitigating factor, start hunting antique and salvage shops for old sinks, basins or clawfoot tubs. (Maybe even toilets - I don't know what kind of sense of humor your wife has.) :D I once saw a miniature clawfoot tub that would've made a perfect bog container - I guess it was for a baby or something. There are also the sit-up tubs that are shaped kind of like chairs and are about half the length of your typical modern bathtub. One of those would be plenty of space for a modest bog planting, and the extra depth would mean less frequent watering. If you really wanted to go all-out on it, you could put a divider in between the high and low sections of the tub wall, and make a fountain/waterfall type thing in it. Just make sure that whatever you use has been sealed well; cover any cracks in the finish with an appropriate waterproofer of some sort.
    Otherwise, you could always do something like a potted terrarium; remove the plants, pot them individually, then put small (but preferably tall) water trays inside the wooden planter and fill the gaps with LFS or whatever media you prefer - I would try a live Sphagnum topping but I imagine keeping live Sphagnum happy might be more of a challenge in your parts. You can cut PVC pipe to fit for trays that extend almost all the way up to the rim of the planter, and put a cap on one end. If you do it right, the pots won't be visible when placed in their trays. This has the added bonus of being very easy to maintain.
    ~Joe
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    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
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  7. #15
    "Oh, now he's a philosophizer" Baylorguy's Avatar
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    Thanks Joe -

    All really good ideas. I don't know why I didn't think to put some sort of liner inside the planter... now that I am reading around I see most people with things such as barrel bogs have a liner inside and pvc pipe as you described going down to the bottom of the planter.

    I would be ok with doing this, but my concern now is that I am disturbing the plants too much by removing them from the planter to find better conditions. What do you think? Should they be ok to replant since they are dormant?

  8. #16
    Stay chooned in for more! Clint's Avatar
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    I like to grow plants in pots in trays of water rather than bog-style. In the summer, I fill the trays (rubbermaid tubs) with RO water to submerge 1/4th of the height of the pots. I let it evaporate and when it's dry, I refill. If I was going to leave for a week and it was summer, since the summers here are very hot and have little rain, I'd pour enough water in the trays to submerge half the pot. I use half-gallon pots BTW. If you have a very large container (...like a rubbermaid tub lol) you can poke some holes in the bottom, add some garden cloth to the bottom (to keep the media from coming out of the holes) and make a drained bog-garden. I did that once with extra plants with great results, just be sure to top-water every few days. If I had all the time in the world and RO filters were much faster, I wouldn't use trays at all.

    In the fall, once most of the pitchers are halfway dead and the plants look crappy, I cut off EVERYTHING down to the ground including phyllodia. I spray with a fungicide (just in case!) and take the plants out of their trays and forget about them until spring. In rains enough in the winter where I live so that I don't water the plants at all, the media dries up but still stays barely damp, enough to support a dormant rhizome and it's roots.

    Sarracenia replant very well, go for it.

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