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Thread: Sarr cross-pollination rules?

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    You do self pollination but generally - as some have stated - that the yield is less. I attribute this phenomena to sarracenia being protogynous - where the female organs are receptive before the male ones such that by the time you have ripe pollen, the female ovaries are almost to non-receptive. However nothing says that you can't take pollen from a flower that has opened a few days prior to pollinate one which has just opened. It's just a matter of timing. Self pollination from a previously opened flower to another flower on the same plant seems to happen rather frequently in some species - such as S. rubra - where the plant puts out a number of flowers - sometimes even two from the same scape.
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    It also has to do with the structure of the flowers. In family Droseraceae the anthers and stigma are exposed next to each other. An insect crawling over them can't help but spread pollen from the anthers to the stigma. Wind can do this too. And with most when the flower closes it will press the anthers against the stigma. Timing is not so important since the flowers close as long as the stigma are receptive and the pollen is still fertile when the flower closes.

    With Sarracenia the flowers do not close. The stigma are separated from anthers by the petals and sepals. The structure of the flower makes it more likely that an insect will brush against a stigma when entering the flower than when leaving it. This increases the likelihood that pollen will be transferred from flower to flower.

    Here we go:

    Inbreeding, outbreeding, and heterosis in the yellow pitcher plant, Sarracenia flava (Sarraceniaceae), in Virginia
    Philip M. Sheridan and David N. Karowe
    (American Journal of Botany. 2000;87:1628-1633.)

    Self-pollination resulted in significantly lower offspring quantity and quality. Total seed number and total seed mass for self-pollinated capsules were approximately one-fourth that of outcrossed capsules. Germination, survivorship, and growth over 5 yr were also significantly lower for offspring from self-pollinated capsules. Together, these results suggest strong inbreeding depression in this species.
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    That is an interesting article, especially that S. flava from NC did not exhibit any inbreeding depression.

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    Here's a paper on interbreeding of S. purpurea in Switzerland. The plant has become invasive there. It raises the possibility of a mechanism that allows purging of deleterious genes from the formation of "family groups". It is also noted that the Swiss populations produce up to 15 flower scapes while S. purpurea populations in their native habitats produce 1 or 2 scapes.

    http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/co.../95/2/277#SEC5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Not a Number View Post
    Here's a paper on interbreeding of S. purpurea in Switzerland. The plant has become invasive there. It raises the possibility of a mechanism that allows purging of deleterious genes from the formation of "family groups". It is also noted that the Swiss populations produce up to 15 flower scapes while S. purpurea populations in their native habitats produce 1 or 2 scapes.

    http://aob.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/co.../95/2/277#SEC5
    So if I'm reading this right, it would mean that S.purpurea is unaffected by inbreeding?
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    For the Swiss population, yes. The native US populations are obviously different since they don't produce 15 scapes. It may have been the plants that the Swiss populations began with had these traits.

    If S. purpurea have become invasive they are obviously expanding. Producing a large number of seed would be advantageous.

    As for the NC S. flava populations vs Virginia populations, Hummer's study was begun in the late 50's and Meadowviews study in the 80's. The populations in the 50's were larger and possibly less inbred to begin with where as the Virgina populations were already in a decline from habitat loss. Indeed today there are no Sarracenia sites left except those where plants are being reintorduced.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Not a Number View Post
    For the Swiss population, yes. The native US populations are obviously different since they don't produce 15 scapes. It may have been the plants that the Swiss populations began with had these traits.
    Hmmm, I was considering selfing my two purpurea flowers, that's why I was curious.
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    O_O WOT? Super-Purpurea?

    ME WANT!
    "There is no pain as great as being alive,
    no burden heavier than that of conscious life. "
    -Rubén Darío-

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