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Thread: new ceph hummers giant

  1. #33
    J-rod's Avatar
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    thanks guys well ill post some more photos in a few weeks. ill back up the lights to about 10in and see how that does.

    thanks agean

  2. #34
    mobile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J-rod View Post
    is the new growth that color because it might be dieing? like i said earlyer this is a new plant i just got it not that long ago. i have it under 4 T8 grow lights about 4-6 in away. what im worried about is that its new growth that is dieing for some reason.
    The new growth looks firm and shiny to me. Dying Cephalotus leaves and pitchers are limp and dull looking. A better close-up of the growing point would help with the advise. I have a Cephalotus 'Big Boy' 5cm (2") away from a 20W daylight compact fluorescent (CFL) and it takes on similar colouration to the new growth on your plant. It might be worth checking the temperature at the growing point of your plant, if you can get a thermometer/temperature probe in there.

  3. #35
    Not Growing Up! GrowinOld's Avatar
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    How about another opinion...?
    It looks to me like the "dark new growth" is possibly rotting leaves perhaps from a rotting crown? They do look shiny, but not healthy. Very hard to tell from the picture.

    You may have cooked it under bright/hot lights as others suggest, or it is simply still just showing the latter stages of the "over-watering" as mentioned earlier. (I still agree with what BigBella said earlier, and I believe you are still seeing the results of the exact problem he mentioned... "newer growers in particular, tend to keep Cephalotus far too wet from the outset".)

    In view of your current discovery of "black/dark" leaves in the center crown of the plant, it looks to me to be another result of the damage that has already been done by it being kept too wet, and if it is, then it's too late to just "try let it dry some".

    Once rot starts, it will continue. If the plant crown is indeed rotting, the sooner you can determine it the better, as rot will quickly spread and kill off what is left of your plant.

    If it were me, I would at least try to get a look at the upper main root (if not all the roots)
    to see if they are still alive! If not via the root, you need to find out somehow if the crown is rotting out, and I don't think you will have "weeks" to do that.
    To really determine how to proceed to "help" the plant, I think it is important to find out the current condition of the entire plant.
    Just my opinion.

    Well, its hard to tell for sure from just looking at the picture and not the plant itself, but no matter what it is, I definitely think you will be getting a lot of "growing" experience very soon.

    I guess time will tell.
    I wish you Good Luck, J-rod!
    Experience is the best teacher. At least it used to be.
    But then, common sense isn't so common anymore, is it.


    http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=113866

  4. #36
    mobile's Avatar
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    I cannot see any evidence of rot in the pictures you posted. As I stated earlier, see if you can get a better picture of the crown. I would suggest that you wait for a few more replies before changing anything as it sound like your plant has been through enough stress without subjecting it to more and uprooting it will definately stress it.

  5. #37
    mass's Avatar
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    Do you guys have those on straight LFS, or with a little perlite in there? I've been wondering how they would grow in that kind of sub.

  6. #38
    BigBella's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by massmorels View Post
    Do you guys have those on straight LFS, or with a little perlite in there? I've been wondering how they would grow in that kind of sub.
    Cephalotus is generally grown in loose, peat-based mixes (http://www.aqph26.dsl.pipex.com/cephalotusfollil.html), occasionally with a live sphagnum moss top-dressing to provide humidity. Using only the moss as a substrate would make transplanting a bit more difficult, considering the extreme length and potential for entanglement of some Cephalotus roots (http://www.cpukforum.com/forum/index...opic=36117&hl=) . . .
    “Sì perché l'autorità dell'opinione di mille nelle scienze non val per una scintilla di ragione di un solo . . ."

    -- Galileo "Biff" Galilei

  7. #39
    J-rod's Avatar
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    ok i checked the temp its at 86 F right next to the plante. when i first got this plant it was in a pot with 100% peat moss. it was really wet and compressed so i repoted the little plant in my mix which is 50% peat 30% perlite, and 20% sand. here are some more photos.








  8. #40
    mass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigBella View Post
    Cephalotus is generally grown in loose, peat-based mixes (http://www.aqph26.dsl.pipex.com/cephalotusfollil.html), occasionally with a live sphagnum moss top-dressing to provide humidity. Using only the moss as a substrate would make transplanting a bit more difficult, considering the length and potential for entanglement of some Cephalotus roots (http://www.cpukforum.com/forum/index...opic=36117&hl=) . . .
    I know all of that.. I grow mine on 3:2:1:1 peat, perlite, LFS, and sand. I haven't repotted my newest Ceph, just because it's doing so well with what it's in now. I was more just curious of the results people have with growing in straight LFS. I suppose I could leave 1 or 2 of my leaf cuttings that are in LFS as they grow up. Might be a good little comparison experiment.

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