User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 17 to 22 of 22

Thread: Helioamphora vs cephalotus

  1. #17
    instigator thez_yo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    San Diego, USA
    Posts
    5,025
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    BigBella: agreed. I use both when things are in danger of going south. I neem&cinnamon sundews, cephs & sarrs when they start looking slimy, or just 2X a year to "clean up" the soil.

  2. #18
    Hermopolis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Liverpool, UK
    Posts
    271
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by RSS View Post
    I wonder if anyone has tried using cinnamon (a fungicide) when one of there Ceph's start this. I've used it with orchids with good success when I end up with rotting due to user error.
    I started using cinnamon for nepenthes cuttings this year. It works great! All my cuttings succumbed to fungus prior to using it. I'm very happy with it.

    -Hermes.
    "The grass withers, the flower fades. But the word of our God stands forever." (Isaiah 40:8)

    My Grow List Updated Oct 22/2010.

  3. #19
    mobile's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Aberdeenshire, Scotland
    Posts
    1,070
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    For me, with my growing conditions, Cephalotus grow more successfully than Heliamphora. I have some success with growing Heliamphora x heterodoxa hybrids in similar conditions to Cephalotus but Heliamphora species typically require more 'specialised' conditions. As an example, I have a Cephalotus and a Heliamphora heterodoxa x ionasii both growing on my kitchen windowsill, they both produce pitchers but the Heliamphora does not produce good nectar spoons.I find Cephalotus to be really easy and non demanding to grow. If I invested money and time in a terrarium, with appropriate lighting and night time drops then maybe Heliamphora would grow better but Cephalotus don't need all of this and are happy to grow on a windowsill or under a CFL. Please be aware that this is in 'my growing conditions' and other growers in different climates will have different results.

  4. #20
    Lover of Mountains nightsky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    near Salt Lake City
    Posts
    1,409
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    In my limited experience, I think Cephs are easier. Not that heli's are much different, but they are touchy for me due to humidity. They seem so sensitive to humidity fluctuations and dry out fairly easy. It keeps me on my toes to make sure I check my humidifier every day. Missed a day last week, and they took quite a hit. The cephs didn't hiccup.

  5. #21
    --Freedom Czar-- Fryster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    z5/6, Lansing, MI
    Posts
    1,010
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Cephs are easier for me in my growing conditions. Heli's are a very different story:

    I once had three species and hybrids of Heli's and they never produced one adult pitcher in 2½ years of "growing". I could not get my conditions both light enough and cool enough for Heli's I guess. Plus the high humidity requirements encouraged far too many molds, fugus etc.

    I had to sell/trade them away a while back. Too bad too, they're such beautiful plants when grown well.

    I'm envious of those that CAN grow Heli's well.
    Only a moral and virtuous people are capable of freedom; the more corrupt and vicious a people becomes, the more it has need of masters. -- Benjamin Franklin

  6. #22
    BigBella's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    SF, CA
    Posts
    2,972
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Fryster View Post
    Cephs are easier for me in my growing conditions. Heli's are a very different story:

    I once had three species and hybrids of Heli's and they never produced one adult pitcher in 2½ years of "growing". I could not get my conditions both light enough and cool enough for Heli's I guess. Plus the high humidity requirements encouraged far too many molds, fugus etc.

    I had to sell/trade them away a while back. Too bad too, they're such beautiful plants when grown well.

    I'm envious of those that CAN grow Heli's well.
    If you can manage highland conditions to accommodate, say, Nepenthes, you can also very easily grow Heliamphora and Cephalotus in that same setting. Also, the only reason that your Heliamphora didn't produce adult leaves had nothing to do with your cultivation; they were simply too young.

    I have had some species -- H. exappendiculata and H. glabra -- which took upwards of three years or more to produce their first adult pitchers . . .
    “Sì perché l'autorità dell'opinione di mille nelle scienze non val per una scintilla di ragione di un solo . . ."

    -- Galileo "Biff" Galilei

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Similar Threads

  1. New Cephalotus
    By Wolfn in forum Pitcher Plants: (Sarracenia, Heliamphora, Darlingtonia, Cephalotus)
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 02-02-2010, 09:15 PM
  2. Cephalotus
    By Kirkscoastalcarnivores in forum Pitcher Plants: (Sarracenia, Heliamphora, Darlingtonia, Cephalotus)
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-05-2004, 03:49 PM
  3. Cephalotus
    By Wesley in forum Pitcher Plants: (Sarracenia, Heliamphora, Darlingtonia, Cephalotus)
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 01-24-2004, 11:32 AM
  4. Cephalotus
    By Sarracenia0 in forum Pitcher Plants: (Sarracenia, Heliamphora, Darlingtonia, Cephalotus)
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 06-21-2003, 09:04 AM
  5. My new cephalotus
    By Capslock in forum Pitcher Plants: (Sarracenia, Heliamphora, Darlingtonia, Cephalotus)
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-09-2003, 10:10 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •