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Thread: Growing Cephalotus follicularis on a Vertical Wall?

  1. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by mobile View Post
    I think that it's as much to do with the light colour as the intensity. I find that Cephalotus colour up nicely under white LED. Most white LEDs are actually blue with phosphor coating, therefore have a strong peak in the blue spectrum. I have read that levels of anthocyanin, the plant pigment responsible for colouration, increase under blue or UV light.
    I have two division from the same mother plant, the big Cephalotus is one and the other is growing under the same T5HO bulbs. This Cephalotus is closer to the bulbs than the other, both are about 12" from the end of the tube (one of each end). The big Cephalotus is about 4-5" closer to the bulbs, this Cephalotus is growing pitchers about three times the size of the other. One is going for size and the other great color...Same clone, very very similiar lighting, same temps. Humidity, soil, watering are all different.

    As I said, I don't get it.

    Added a quick photo for reference. This is the same clone 4-5" further away from the same bulbs as the "big Cephalotus".
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 03-06-2011 at 04:55 PM. Reason: N. A.

  2. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by RSS View Post
    The big Cephalotus has colored up some, although I'm still hoping for more color. I don't understand Cephalotus coloration...the same clone under less light is way darker than this one.
    Red coloration on a Cephalotus is dependent on the clone, light intensity AND temperature.

    These plants on the picture are of the same clone (at least I think so, they are mass produced plants purchased from the same table in the same shop with the same green starting color, but have had different cultivation conditions):


    The green plant has been kept indoors at about 20C and artificial lighting.
    The reddish plant has been kept outdoors, about 5 hours of direct sunlight, from May until November.

    Most of the red coloration appeared with falling temperatures outdoors during September, October and November while the midday sun elevation and the temperatures were much lower than in July/August.

    So if you notice better red with lower light levels, then maybe the additional heat dissipation if the "better" light (more Watt = more heat, less distance to the lamp = more heat) prevent better coloration because of higher temperatures under the "better" lights?
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 03-06-2011 at 04:55 PM. Reason: N. A.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jesse View Post
    Red coloration on a Cephalotus is dependent on the clone, light intensity AND temperature.

    These plants on the picture are of the same clone (at least I think so, they are mass produced plants purchased from the same table in the same shop with the same green starting color, but have had different cultivation conditions):

    The green plant has been kept indoors at about 20C and artificial lighting.
    The reddish plant has been kept outdoors, about 5 hours of direct sunlight, from May until November.

    Most of the red coloration appeared with falling temperatures outdoors during September, October and November while the midday sun elevation and the temperatures were much lower than in July/August.

    So if you notice better red with lower light levels, then maybe the additional heat dissipation if the "better" light (more Watt = more heat, less distance to the lamp = more heat) prevent better coloration because of higher temperatures under the "better" lights?
    The difference in temps is at best 2-3 degree F. I am positive they are the same clone as I have only every had 1 'typical'. Now I've divided it into a ton.

    This is not the first time I've grown clones in very similiar conditions and had drastic differences in color. My next guess would be mediums as I use a wide range of mediums. When I've matched the light/temps/clone/humidity/watering I'm only left with air flow and medium?

    Some orchids take on a purplish color in higher light, some fern leaves grow larger in lower light, other plants turn purple in lower light, but they all start growing that way and are always that color/size, the Cephalotus are starting green, getting old then changing color. Some pitchers stay green for weeks, others start growing redish. I'm sure we (as a community) as missing an element. Lights/temps/+?

    I know lighting and temps are factors, I'm just thinking there is more to it.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 03-06-2011 at 04:56 PM. Reason: N. A.

  4. #60
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    Could be medium, as my Cephalotus grown in a dune sand/peat mix took on a really dark colouration.

  5. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by RSS View Post
    Lights/temps/+?

    I know lighting and temps are factors, I'm just thinking there is more to it.
    Maybe pH and humidity of the substrate?

    Or maybe mineral concentration of iron, magnesium or aluminum in the substrate?

    Or maybe pH has an influence on availability of certain minerals in the substrate and it is the combination of pH and minerals?

    I think we have a lot of things to examine before finding out.

    Coloration of Cephalotus seen on pictures in the Internet may also be influenced by Photoshop, I think.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 03-06-2011 at 04:57 PM. Reason: N. A.

  6. #62

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    I've never considered pH, but I'll add it the list. I probably have a large difference in pH between those two mediums. Guess I should start looking for a soil pH tester.

    Yes, photoshop is a problem.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 03-06-2011 at 04:58 PM. Reason: N. A.

  7. #63

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    A few more pitchers, and they are getting bigger!
    Cephalotus Typical

    Little bit larger. Another good example for the "I hate moss" photo's.
    Cephalotus Typical

  8. #64

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    Here they are as of this morning, the front pitcher is 1.75" from top of the lid to the bottom.
    First Ceph 23 Apr 11

    Second Ceph 23 Apr 11

    The Cryptocoryne parva is finally starting to creep its way up the hill.
    Cryptocoryne parva Plant Hill

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