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Thread: Leucophylla is a late sleeper

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    PolishJeff's Avatar
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    Leucophylla is a late sleeper

    My S. Leucophylla is sleeping-in late this year. It flowered four beautiful blooms in March, but since then has been subdued to this. You can see the flower stalks I trimmed back since I have no need for seed now. Is this typical for S. Leucos? In my experience, these guys made wonderful fall pitchers, but usually put on some nice growth along with all the others.

    I guess this is just tarnok's 'personality' shining through. Saving the best for last

    ...or my roots are rotten? Time will tell.






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    clippity-clip-clip Clue's Avatar
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    Funny, Tarnocks are usually one of the first Sarrs up, I've heard.

    If that flava (is it?) and purpurea are okay next to it, it may just be taking it's sweet time.




    I like you bisquamata!!
    "I, for one, can't wait to grow Nepenthes extincta!"
    Plant List ; blog

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    Aklys joossa's Avatar
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    I hear ya man. Some of my Sarrs haven't done anything. All their rhizomes are fine, but it seems like they don't want to get out of bed!
    -Joel from Southern California


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    PolishJeff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clue View Post

    ...If that flava (is it?) and purpurea are okay next to it, it may just be taking it's sweet time.


    I like you bisquamata!!

    Thanks! The bisquamata spread like crazy around the roots of most of my Sarrs.

    Oh, and close, the sleepy Leuco sleeps next to an Oreo

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    BigBella's Avatar
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    More than few Sarracenia seem later this year than last.

    C'mon, I expect insect control by mid-May . . .
    “Sì perché l'autorità dell'opinione di mille nelle scienze non val per una scintilla di ragione di un solo . . ."

    -- Galileo "Biff" Galilei

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    Moderator Alexis's Avatar
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    Leucophylla can be quite sensitive. The common wisdom that cutting off flowers = more pitchers doesn't hold true in my opinion. It's probably slightly shocked at having growing tissue removed.

    I don't subscribe to the flowers wasting energy theory. They stay on the plant all year and photosynthesise for the plant. Seeds are packets of energy, so if you want plenty of pitchers, let the plant flower but don't pollinate it.

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    scottychaos's Avatar
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    I do subscribe to the flowers wasting energy theory. I dont think cutting off a flower stalk would "shock" a plant at all.. and a small green flower stalk adds very little in the way of extra photosynthesis energy..and I believe cutting off the flower stalks as soon as they appear will result in more pitchers, which have far more photosynthesis potential than a skinny flower stalk. Flowering itself still takes energy, even if you dont let seeds develope..and if the plant is outside, you cant easily prevent pollination and seed development anyway.
    so if you want plenty of pitchers, cut off those flower stalks as soon as they appear.

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    Moderator Alexis's Avatar
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    The large umbrella style and sepals provide more energy over their lifetime than it takes to produce them. Even the skinny stems have a lot of surface area - imagine rolling them out. A 60cm tall stem probably has a surface area of 120 square centimetres. And they last longer than the equivalent pitcher.

    Nature generally doesn't waste energy and has well evolved energy budgets IMO.

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