User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 6 12345 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 47

Thread: Darlingtonia californica varieties

  1. #1
    SDCPs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1,188
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Question Darlingtonia californica varieties

    Hello friends,

    I've recently become interested in the Cobra Lilly.

    I'm wondering about the two varieties out there. I live in San Diego, on top of a hill with constant breeze. It doesn't get too hot here, the low 80s are the normal highs for summer.

    So what variety, the mountain or the coastal would grow best here? We don't have a very cold winter, but we have warm summers.

    Maybe we can't grow them at all? What do you think?

    Thanks!

    EDIT: If you want to just skip to the photo section, click here.
    Last edited by SDCPs; 03-17-2011 at 07:23 PM. Reason: See text

  2. #2
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Olympia, Washington
    Posts
    4,064
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You should be able to grow either, although I think the common wisdom is that the mountain strains are easier in general. I don't all too much believe there's a huge difference if you're getting a seed-grown plant; I tend to subscribe to the theory that it's tissue-cultured Darlingtonia that are particularly finicky. My plants have endured a tremendous amount of abuse and they're coastal varieties, apparently.
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

  3. #3
    BigBella's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    SF, CA
    Posts
    2,972
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Either variety would serve you well in San Diego, since both the coastal and mountain populations see similar temperatures and weather . . .
    “Sì perché l'autorità dell'opinione di mille nelle scienze non val per una scintilla di ragione di un solo . . ."

    -- Galileo "Biff" Galilei

  4. #4
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    7,506
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Technically these are neither varieties nor forms as there are no morphological differences between the two populations.

    Your daytime air temperatures are not that important as long as you keep the root/soil temperatures below 83F (29C). And a good night time temperature drop would be helpful - it might even be necessary for the long term welfare of the plants.

    Peter D'Amato notes this species can be successfully grown on the California coast all the way down to San Diego.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  5. #5
    DETHCHEEZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    410
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm in Long Beach / Not to far from Diego
    I've tried growing them a few times with no luck & finally gave up on trying
    Even tried spray painting the pots white
    But hey it could just be me

    [/QUOTE]Peter D'Amato notes this species can be successfully grown on the California coast all the way down to San Diego.[/QUOTE]

    But he also talks about watering them with refrigerated water or using ice cubes

    Good Luck
    Hope you can get some to grow for you
    Wish I could

    DC

  6. #6
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    7,506
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I grow plants from both populations right here at Venice beach. No ice cubes or chilled water are needed. I top water them daily, twice durning hot days. Over sized clay pots and an airy mix of long fiber sphagnum and perlite (30/70) and shade the pots with other pots is all I do. My mature plants have flowered every year for the past three years.

    There's no difference in growth that I can see between the two populations.

    Los Angeles is closer to Long Beach than Long Beach is to San Diego (23 vs 93 miles).

    Again the key to growing this species appears to be keeping the roots cool and nightly temperature drops as well as respecting dormancy. There are a number of ways to achieve this that don't need ice cubes or chilled water. Which method works best depends a great deal on your environment and resources.
    Last edited by Not a Number; 07-01-2010 at 11:42 PM.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  7. #7
    DETHCHEEZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    410
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Oh, I Wasn't Doubting Anyone Or Say It Couldn't Be Done
    Was Just Saying That I Never Had Any Luck With Them

    The 1st Time I Know Was My Bad
    I Was Trying To Grow Them With My Sarrs

    The 2nd & 3rd Try I Had Them In a Shadier, Cooler Spot In 9in. Pots
    In About a 1 To 1 Mix Of Peat, Pumice & Perlite

    The Problem I was Having Was That They Wouldn't Grow Or If They Did They Didn't Get Very Big Before They Dried Out & Died

    Could Have Been The Stock I had Too
    All Of Them Were Tiny To Small Plants I Bought Online

    If You Have Any Advice / Tips / Tricks You Would Like To Share It Would Be Greatly Appreciated

    DC

  8. #8
    BigBella's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    SF, CA
    Posts
    2,972
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Not a Number View Post
    Technically these are neither varieties nor forms as there are no morphological differences between the two populations.
    True enough, but Barry Rice, in his studies of Sierra Darlingtonia populations still spoke in terms of "variants," particularly in their pitcher appearance or coloration; and it was from that site that he obtained the anthocyanin-free plants, D. californica 'Othello'

    Otherwise, I definitely agree that root temperature is far more an issue than that of the air; and I have grown the very same plants in Northern California and the Southland -- and have used exclusively unglazed terracotta pots . . .
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 02-11-2011 at 08:18 AM. Reason: Nomenclature adjustment
    “Sì perché l'autorità dell'opinione di mille nelle scienze non val per una scintilla di ragione di un solo . . ."

    -- Galileo "Biff" Galilei

Page 1 of 6 12345 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Darlingtonia californica
    By aprilh in forum Conservation Station
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-24-2016, 12:30 PM
  2. Darlingtonia californica
    By glider14 in forum Pitcher Plants: (Sarracenia, Heliamphora, Darlingtonia, Cephalotus)
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 11-09-2005, 03:37 AM
  3. Darlingtonia californica
    By Ryan in forum General Discussions
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-08-2002, 04:32 PM
  4. Darlingtonia californica
    By Ryan in forum Pitcher Plants: (Sarracenia, Heliamphora, Darlingtonia, Cephalotus)
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-08-2002, 04:32 PM
  5. Darlingtonia californica
    By jadubya in forum Pitcher Plants: (Sarracenia, Heliamphora, Darlingtonia, Cephalotus)
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 07-02-2002, 12:37 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •