User Tag List

Informational! Informational!:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 8 of 11

Thread: stolon cuttings

  1. #1
    raymond's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    DC area
    Posts
    143
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    stolon cuttings

    In cobra lilys seed grown plants are usually more vigorus than plants from tissue culture. If fact i have heard of may whose only succes was a seed grown plant. I have also heard of people succeding with african violetes in Dart frog terrariums when cuttings of the plant were rooted in there.

    I wonder if people on the east coast might succed with plants grown from cuttings.

  2. #2
    CPsam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Oregon, USA
    Posts
    249
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Possibly, but the challenge with Cobras lies mainly in keeping the roots constantly wet and cool. I have seen these plants in the wild in sever conditions such as full sun, little organic soil, heavy metal environments (ex. magnesium from serpentine) and the consistant factor which determines their healthy growth is cool water around the roots, either running or in some cases stagnant. Achieving this condition will allow your cobra to thrive.

    Plants originating from mountainous locations have been speculated to perform better than those from coastal areas. You might want to look into a clone with known mountain origins or that other growers on the east coast have had success with.

  3. #3
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Olympia, Washington
    Posts
    4,064
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm not certain how vital cool temperatures are for the roots, so long as water is freely available. I've actually let several of my seed-grown plants go crispy dry on accident and had them come back several days later, good as new, after immersing the rootball and allowing them to rehydrate. Of course, I'm spoiled by my location.
    ~Joe
    o//~ Livin' like a bug ain't easy / My old clothes don't seem to fit me /
    I got little tiny bug feet / I don't really know what bugs eat /
    Don't want no one steppin' on me / Now I'm sympathizin' with fleas /
    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

  4. #4
    SirKristoff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Puyallup, WA United States
    Posts
    4,132
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Good luck finding the mountain location plants! there is one nursery that will release a small number of them every now and then, and a friend of mine who rarely sells cobras but his are all seedgrown or divisions from his mother plant which is from a mountain location...and yes, in my experience, they are a bit more tolerant than the coastal origin/location plants, though otherwise are no different as far as looks go....
    the problem in my opinion does seem to be keeping the roots cool, as well as good oxygen flow...these plants generally grow in areas where cold water from the mountains, passes through or over the roots...
    though just as Joe above me said, i am also spoiled by my location, sharing the same zone and everything as the darlingtonia just south of me, so i have no problems with them what so ever...
    i will say, that live sphagnum seems to be like the miracle worker with cobras...ive had divisions from my plant, planted in dead LFS, or peat/perlite that never do as well as my plant in live LFS, probably again indicating the oxygen available...


    Would also like to point out the irony that the first 3 people to reply, are spoiled location brats :P (all in the northwest where these things are easier than what they normally would be for anyone else)

  5. #5
    Come To The Light. . . JB in Utah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Orem, Utah
    Posts
    182
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I say go for the stolon cuttings, it's worth a try.
    As far as environmental conditions go, I've had success using a large white ceramic soup mug that I drilled a hole in (using a bit made for ceramic). The white color of the mug helps to reflect as much light away as possible to keep the soil (LFS/Perlite) from warming too much. The mug sits in about an inch or so of water in the tray that dries between watering sessions, I top water.
    I have low humidity (less than 40% usually) and my cobra is grown on an east facing windowsill with an average of six hours of sun each day. Different from the spoiled ones above, I live in a very arid and hot location (at least during the summer.) Cobra is a death cube rescue but very vigorous.
    I should say something witty or remarkable but that would only prove my worth to society. To that I say meh!

    The List That Grows. . . Utah Members Here!

  6. #6
    raymond's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    DC area
    Posts
    143
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Its intresting how all the difficult carnivores are difficult for the same reason. D regia, Heliamphora, Highland nepenthes, cobra lilys... they all need cool tempatures and are therefore easily grown by people in the pacific northwest and UK!

    I have heard of many people succeding their cobras on east and north windowsills when all else failed, but never in a place like utah!!

  7. #7
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    7,506
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A crappy or vigorous growing plant is just that, no matter what the source. In any large enough batch of seedlings you have those that grow faster than others as well as some very lamers. If crappy growing plants were the source for tissue culture stock then odds are the resulting clones will also be crappy growers.

    Plants from stolons have the advantage over plants from seeds in that they mature faster. Say 3-5 years to flowering versus 5-7 years from seed. Odds are a stolon offshoot of a crappy grower is going to be a crappy grower.

    I have seedlings from mountain and lowland populations and as a groups there is little difference between the growth. If not for the color, the highlanders are D. 'Othello' x ? (all except one have no red coloring) I couldn't tell them apart base only on growth. In my conditions neither group is any easier or more difficult to grow.

    Dr. Leo Song found that root temperatures over 81F are fatal to this species. As long as you keep the root temperatures below 82F the plants should survive. If you have to resort to chilled water or ice cubes due to your cultivation situation so be it. Large, thick walled, insulated or shaded pots will help keep the medium from warming up.

    This species appear to need fairly cool winter periods for adequate dormancy. They also appear to need a decent night time temperature drop. Cooler climates again give the cultivator the advantage.

    Like others I've come to the conclusion that this species requires the roots to be well oxygenated in order to thrive. Running/circulating water or top watering without constant flooding and loose airy media helps to achieve this.
    Last edited by Not a Number; 09-25-2010 at 11:01 AM.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  8. #8
    RL7836's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    3,252
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by raymond View Post
    In cobra lilys seed grown plants are usually more vigorus than plants from tissue culture.
    I have my doubts about this assertion ...

    Quote Originally Posted by CPsam View Post
    Plants originating from mountainous locations have been speculated to perform better than those from coastal areas.
    Interesting that plants from higher elevations would be more receptive to warmer temps ... Is this due to the coastal cooling effect on the west coast?

    I tried to grow some cobras outside for several years - always failed. After one of those trials - I had an epiphany - the farm where I was raised had a small spring which had cool water all summer trickling over rocks next to the house (the springs origin supplied our drinking water). I got a few plants and took them back to plant a few next to the house ......... My brother (who now owns the old farm) had timbered the hillside the prior year to get a few dollars. The silt from the logging had made the little spring creek a muddy mess filled with three foot high invasive grasses - no longer Darlingtonia habitat ...
    All the best,
    Ron
    You must do the thing you think you cannot do. --- Eleanor Roosevelt

    *** Growlist / Wants / Offers ***
    (with Pics)

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Cobra Lily (parent & stolon)
    By jimscott in forum Pitcher Plants: (Sarracenia, Heliamphora, Darlingtonia, Cephalotus)
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-16-2008, 06:27 AM
  2. Cuttings?
    By little Nices in forum Carnivorous Plant Trading Post
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-15-2006, 02:57 PM
  3. Cuttings
    By glider14 in forum Sundews (Drosera), Byblis, Drosophyllum
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 02-26-2006, 04:59 PM
  4. Cuttings!
    By SunPitcher in forum Carnivorous Plant Trading Post
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-10-2005, 07:47 AM
  5. Looking cuttings
    By weser in forum Cactus and other Succulents
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 10-13-2003, 04:12 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •