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Thread: Should I have a humidity dome for Cephalotus?

  1. #9
    SirKristoff's Avatar
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    moving a plant around like that will stress it out, as it wont be able to adjust to one certain condition....
    IME there is a sweet spot for cephs, and finding it seems to be a bit of a pain....and once you do find it, if you move it, its all over lol.
    so basically put
    no i do not advise a humidity dome, get all sorts of fun fungus,mold,mildew etc...

    how much moss do you have in your mix? is it pure sphagnum, or is it only a top dressing?
    i use sphagnum has a top dressing, but i also have adequate air circulation....

  2. #10
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    http://culturesheet.org/cephalotacea...s:follicularis
    Cephalotus is a slow growing plant which doesn't appreciate disturbance very well. This is often one of the problems when growing it for the first time: It can take a while before they recover from transplant or transport shock and during this time the novice grower panics and changes the growing conditions - making things worse. After obtaining a new plant you should give it a dedicated spot and let it recover for at least 6 months before evaluating its health. It's very probable that your plant will experience periods of several months where nothing happens, even though it should be pushing new growth.
    Cephalotus will also slow down pitcher growth and grow non-carnivorous leaves in the late fall and winter.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

  3. #11
    Agent of Chaos Wolfn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SirKristoff View Post
    moving a plant around like that will stress it out, as it wont be able to adjust to one certain condition....
    IME there is a sweet spot for cephs, and finding it seems to be a bit of a pain....and once you do find it, if you move it, its all over lol.
    so basically put
    no i do not advise a humidity dome, get all sorts of fun fungus,mold,mildew etc...

    how much moss do you have in your mix? is it pure sphagnum, or is it only a top dressing?
    i use sphagnum has a top dressing, but i also have adequate air circulation....

    The soil is one part peat, two parts perlite, and one part sand, with the top 1/4 inch being pure sphagnum moss
    "I may be on the side of angels, but do not mistake me for one."

    Wolfn's Growlist

  4. #12
    brisco225's Avatar
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    I'll +1 what Kris had to say about the ceph and it's sweet spot. The cephalotus I have been growing for almost ten years is a window lover. I tried under grow lights, under domes, etc, but it always did its best when I had it in a grow window on the south side of the house. Since my remodel job on the house, it lost it's south side grow window, so now it grows next to a window facing the east. It does well, but not as well as it did in that one grow window facing south.

    My point is, they are tougher plants than what you might hear about when it comes to humidity, but at the same time, each plant has its own sweet spot in mind.

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    I've been growing Ceph's in high/mid/low humidity and if I had to pick one, I would go with the open air ones like this.

    http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=122053

    The high humidity ones seem to have a lower strike rate and are generally growing slower. Of course this is subjective and with a very small sample size but the results are no where close. The open air ones are just growing so much faster. They are of the same clone with most factors being equal expect humidity. Of course there are some differences.

    All this is subjective and should be treated as such. Consistancy would be the key I would say.

  6. #14
    RL7836's Avatar
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    For your conditions, the humidity dome probably isn't needed at all. However, depending on how long it has been in there, you should remove it very slowly (week or 3) to allow the plant to acclimate to it's new lower-humidity digs. One of the easier ways to croak a ceph (& many other plants) is to suddenly move it from high humidity to low humidity ...
    Quote Originally Posted by RSS View Post
    I've been growing Ceph's in high/mid/low humidity.....
    Ditto - some on windowsill, some in highland tanks, some in intermediate, some outside all spring, summer, fall (got to bring them in today if I remember). The ones that seem the 'happiest' are in my office tank setup - moderate temps, higher than normal house humidity. In general, Cephs are little weeds that can adapt to a host of conditions.
    All the best,
    Ron
    You must do the thing you think you cannot do. --- Eleanor Roosevelt

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    Moderator Cindy's Avatar
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    From what I've seen...Cephalotus grow in very humid conditions in the wild. They either have water constantly flowing down its media (albeit slow) for those growing on cliff surfaces, or grow in open/sunny swamp areas near the base of much taller plants. They are not found growing in live/dead sphagnum moss.

    In cultivation they would do better with slightly lower humidity. IMHO, keeping them in a dome can help them cope with fluctuating humidity levels but a constantly low humidity won't hurt at all if the plant is already acclimatised.
    Cindy

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