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Thread: My dying Cephalotus...

  1. #17
    sarracenia lover dionae's Avatar
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    Lots of valuable info in this thread. Thanks everyone!

  2. #18
    Not Growing Up! GrowinOld's Avatar
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    Just an added thought, seeing the pic as RL pointed out,
    I take it as a good sign also, now seeing that the stems are yellowing at the pitcher end ("A") and not at the stem/root end ("B"),
    which indicates to me that the plant might not be suffering total root rot,
    which in my experience causes the stem to yellow from the center out,
    and not from the pitcher end inward.


    Not always an accurate way to tell, but in many plants it is a good indicator of final
    "rot or not"!
    (The roots may be getting damaged, but if the "rot" isn't all the way thru the plant, the yellowing is often at the tips and not the center.) Once the "rot" gets into the entire plant, the yellowing will start at the center, which often means it is "near the end" of its life.
    Again, this is just something I have often (not always) noticed, and as such take it as a good sign, to not give up hope.

    Good luck and do post again to let us know how things work out.
    Experience is the best teacher. At least it used to be.
    But then, common sense isn't so common anymore, is it.


    http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...d.php?t=113866

  3. #19
    Lucky Greenhorn Lil Stinkpot's Avatar
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    I don't think the UVA/UVB CFL is *entirely* at fault, though it is completely unnecessary, and does have faults. I know exactly what CFL he's using, and I can't recommend it at all, not for any purpose. While marketed as a reptile basking light, they have been known to give out harmful UVC at times. An easy way to sterilize (kill) your plant, especially if it's not given a rest & weakened by overwatering. Just a regular CFL would do, or any number of lighting options, as long as heat & light intensity are moderated. It sounds like the light's on 24-7. Oh, dear!

    IMHO, it looks like the plant's being attacked from above and below- fried leaves and soggy roots. It's still hanging in there, but is going to be very difficult to revive.
    If you shake a rain stick, you get rain. I need a hamata stick.
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  4. #20
    Let's positive thinking! seedjar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mobile View Post
    It's IR lamps that radiate a lot of heat. UV is at the other end of the spectrum.
    I guess I was referring to heat relative to PAR - I'm familiar with the spectra. I wasn't even thinking about the DNA damage, just that those lamps don't need to be close to the plants to do their thing (which would be supplementary in horticultural applications.) For Cephalotus I would think the same thing about using an ordinary CFL at close distance - it's no incandescent but still more warmth than they need. If you've ever put your hand on one of these while lit, it certainly feels hot and stingy.
    If it were an IR lamp we'd be looking at kindling. XD
    ~Joe
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    Livin' like a bug ain't easy / Livin' like a bug ain't easy... o//~

  5. #21
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    My thought, when I first looked at your photos, was that the plant looked like it was in the process of a come-back after experiencing some undesirable environmental effect, like: sudden exposure to extremely low humidity, having the media too dry for too long, overly strong light exposure, etc. Having that many new pitchers forming, seems like a good sign for the future of the plant.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  6. #22
    mobile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joseph Clemens View Post
    Having that many new pitchers forming, seems like a good sign for the future of the plant.
    Providing that the conditions that made the plant die-back in the first place are rectified.

  7. #23
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Precisely, as mobile said. Thank you mobile, for adding that important snippet of information.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  8. #24
    Hello, I must be going... Not a Number's Avatar
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    Yes, the new growth looks promising, provided sufficient conditions conducive to health growth is maintained. Trim off the dead material. The large pitcher with the red splotches and white fuzz growing on it is not a good sign. Trim it off and treat with a fungicide. Systemic fungicides would be the best option but stuff like Cleary 3336 is difficult to come by in small quantities. I've used sulfur based fungicides on Cephalotus with no detrimental effects (mixed results). See the video linked in this thread for options and usage. Do not apply (as per the FAQs) a popular Trichoderma based product until any existing fungal infections have been controlled.

    Using expensive reptile UV lamps for plants are a waste of money and electricity. Plants do not use the UV wavelengths for photosynthesis.
    Grand Hotel... always the same. People come, people go. Nothing ever happens.

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