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Thread: Rhizome rot or normal aging?

  1. #9
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    For almost eight years, when I lived in the Pacific Northwest (Oak Harbor, Washington), I grew all my adult Sarracenia in gallon size nursery "cans" or larger, and I kept them floating in plastic childeren's wading pools. I almost never lost a plant to rhizome rot, especially after I began using shredded redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) bark as the main media ingredient.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  2. #10
    Aklys joossa's Avatar
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    Thanks for the replies guys!

    The S. leucophylla are potted in a plastic pot. They are growing in 50:50 peat and perlite with a top dressing of sphagnum. For the most part, they have been kept inside my unheated garage since December. However, when the temperature hangs around 32 or higher for more than one night, I take them outside as long as weather permits. If it gets under 30, I bring them in.

    I asked here because to me, it did not seem like the typical descriptions of rhizome rot. Usually, I have read that the rhizome turns all brown and gooey. I have never had rhizome rot in any of my Sarracenia, so I am not 100% sure what it truly looks/feels like.
    Mine was similar to moist newspaper.... sort of on the dry side, definitely not gooey at all, and broke off with with similar properties as moist newspaper.

    I've taken some of your suggestions.... I have applied some neem oil fungicide. Additionally, all of my plants have been taken outside due to better weather conditions.

    Hopefully all will be okay.

    Thanks!
    Last edited by joossa; 02-13-2011 at 09:28 PM. Reason: Nomenclature adjustment
    -Joel from Southern California


  3. #11
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    Do you mean to say you took your plants into a dark, stuffy, garage? And they've basically been in the dark, and with limited ventilation? Yeeikes!
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

  4. #12
    Aklys joossa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joseph Clemens View Post
    Do you mean to say you took your plants into a dark, stuffy, garage? And they've basically been in the dark, and with limited ventilation? Yeeikes!
    ...been doing it for the past four years and never had any problems.
    -Joel from Southern California


  5. #13
    Moderator Joseph Clemens's Avatar
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    But, in Palmdale, you'll likely never have temperatures colder than Southern Sarracenia species native habitat, though they are more vulnerable in pots than in their native wetlands.
    Joseph Clemens
    Tucson, Arizona, U S A

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    I would not worry about bringing in your plants in the winter. I believe what you recieved was a warning from your plants - I had grown VFT's in a terrarium under lights, without a dormacy period for 2 years when I first started growing - they looked GREAT..after talking to a more seasoned grower who informed me that if I kept doing that, more than likely I would kill the plants with kindness, and unless I gave them a rest I would lose them. Sure enough, they began to dwindle, so I put them outside that winter - terrarium and all - under a protected area and re potted them that spring, and I've still got em! I know your situation is not the same, however, when a plant is subjected to movement from one place to another or not paying attention to dormacy needs can REALLY screw their growth, flowering and overall health up. I say with all plants, including carnivores..find a place where they are happy and leave em alone. They can take our cold temps here on the West coast much easier than back east, our winters are never that harsh - I've had plants freeze solid in their pots here and have had no losses - give them as much sun as possible, winter is just as important as spring, and just because the plants are dormant ( in the nursery business, it's funny how some people are led to believe that sunlight is not as important when herbaceous perennials and deciduous plants go dormant. Plants that are in the ground have adapted to the light changes, and I could go on forever about that, but won't. Any sun lovers I have in pots are moved to sunnier locations in winter and left there ) they still need a good 5 hours, just think of them as ( not trying to sound funny ) coma patients - they still have their needs. Palmdale can get cold in the winter - high deserts do, but when temps rebound during the day - brief freezes won't ( or should'nt ) hurt them.

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