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Thread: Cephalotus Myths

  1. #9
    WRC Fan adamtekium's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfn View Post
    If you can provide the proper growing conditions, Cephalotus is an unkillable beast that will multiply and spread.
    This is my dream.

  2. #10
    SirKristoff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfn View Post
    If you can provide the proper growing conditions, Cephalotus is an unkillable beast that will multiply and spread.
    i wouldnt quite go that far....

  3. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxima View Post
    Hello everyone!
    This is my first post
    Hello and welcome to this forum!

    Quote Originally Posted by maxima View Post
    I'm from Istanbul and ...
    finally decided to stick to plants that can grow on my balcony without the need of a terrarium.
    You are doing absolutely right when keeping Cephalotus at chilly temperatures.

    Your climate in Istanbul is nearly the same as Cephalotus is used to near Albany, Australia. Just have a look at the climate table of temperatures for comparison:

    Albany in C: http://www.worldweather.org/185/c00356.htm#climate
    Istanbul in C: http://www.worldweather.org/014/c00047.htm#climate

    Or if someone prefers Fahrenheit:
    Albany in F: http://www.worldweather.org/185/c00356f.htm#climate
    Istanbul in F: http://www.worldweather.org/014/c00047f.htm#climate

    Daily maximum in summer is a bit higher in Istanbul than in Albany, but stays below 30C in average. Daily minimum drops below 20C in summer months. Looks good in summer half-year.

    Daily minimum temperature stays above freezing point in average nights in winter.
    Looks good in winter, too.

    I'd perhaps close the lid of the tank in January and February to increase the temperature level a bit during these two months and prevent most of the frost, and in the hottest summer months I'd keep the plants only with some morning sun to prevent midday sun.

    Well done - keep it up!

    Unfortunately, in my area (Northern Germany) I can keep Cephalotus only from May until November outdoors and have to take it inside during the rest of the year because winters are too cold here. Cephalotus likes it chilly, but doesn't like freezing.

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    SDCPs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SirKristoff View Post
    i wouldnt quite go that far....
    I agree.

  5. #13
    maxima's Avatar
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    Hey everyone!

    Much thanks for the warm welcome. After I posted this thread, I couldn't see it in the forum. I kept checking back and it wasn't there; thought I had made a mistake while sending the post or some other error had occurred. I was sorta discouraged naturally
    I'm glad it made it!

    Thanks for the feedback. I do agree with NaN, it may be a bit early to celebrate so I guess time will tell if this works in the long run or not.

    Jesse much thanks for the weather comparison, I hadn't thought of doing that. I'm lucky to be living in a similar climate. Istanbul used to be freezing cold in the past but in the last few years, we barely had any snow. This winter it hasn't even snowed yet, not in the city anyway.

    I would like to add 1 detail:

    The big trap of cephalotus grew when it was in another location. It was a balcony again, but not a sunny one. It was bright shade but received about 1-2 hours of sunlight close to noon.
    My plants never got red there (none of my CPs including cephalotus) but they grew bigger.

    Cephalotus receives about 7 hours of direct sunlight right now, on a sunny day that is.

    ---------- Post added at 02:23 PM ---------- Previous post was at 01:54 PM ----------

    Here's something weird (I think):




    Below cephalotus, you see a D. Aliciae pot. This is their second winter outside. They've been through all kinds of bad weather including some snow, frost and heavy wind!

    Originally there were 2 Aliciae plants in the pot. I put them outside in spring and they thrived. Mind, there was a huge population of springtails around at the time, I think it helped them much.
    When winter came, they went all brown and dried up. It was their first winter outside and I thought they died. I didn't give up though, I kept them moist but they didn't stand in water.

    When spring came, I was amazed to find about 6-8 growth points on 2 plants, they looked like hydra. As you can see, they all grew up during spring/summer, they flowered and set seeds.
    Even many seeds fell on the soil (I never collected them, was too busy) and they all germinated!
    No cover, no extra arrangement; but keep in mind it was a very hot + humid summer.

    I took it inside for about a month, and central heating killed all the baby plants but a few. The humidity had dropped to about %10 inside.

    So I took them outside again and they've been there all winter. Some parts are brown but don't worry, I'm pretty sure they will all come back in spring.
    I thought D. Aliciae died under 10C, I was amazed to see them make it through 2 winters and only thrive.

    And lastly, here's how cepha has been doing in february:



    Some day I'll start root divisions to get more plants but I don't dare do that yet...

    cheers from Istanbul


    PS: Cephalotus plants sit on live sphagnum. It may look all black to you but when you scratch it a bit, it's all a healthy stiff green under.
    Last edited by maxima; 02-22-2011 at 05:24 AM. Reason: forgot

  6. #14
    maxima's Avatar
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    Hey everyone,

    My cephalotus have lost half maybe even more of their pitchers and started sprouting light green leaves instead. I admit I've been keeping them a little on the dry side in spite of the rising temperature. I also spray them now and then with soapy water but I must have done that hundreds of times since last summer so I don't think that would be the culprit...
    IF there's a culprit at all.
    I've plucked out the dry/dead pitchers. Is this a seasonal process or should I take action ?


  7. #15
    Tastes like chicken! Exo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxima View Post
    Hey everyone,

    My cephalotus have lost half maybe even more of their pitchers and started sprouting light green leaves instead. I admit I've been keeping them a little on the dry side in spite of the rising temperature. I also spray them now and then with soapy water but I must have done that hundreds of times since last summer so I don't think that would be the culprit...
    IF there's a culprit at all.
    I've plucked out the dry/dead pitchers. Is this a seasonal process or should I take action ?

    Soap breaks down in to minerals when it reaches the soil, and doing this repeatedly can cause massive mineral buildup in the soil. Cephalotus are fairly tolerant of minerals in the soil, but I have a theory considering your situation.....it is possible that the plants are feeding off all the built up minerals from the repeated soap applications, and have dropped their pitchers since there is no longer a need to catch insects..they have all the food they need in the soil. Since this is the case, they have switched over to leaves that can help them photosynthisize and use all those nutrients they are getting.

    I know nepenthes will do this, so I think it's possible that cephs can do it too.....my advice to you is to stop using soapy water needlessly and flush the pots with plenty of clean water to wash some of the soap out....do this enough and you may get some pitchers back.
    Some days it just isn't worth chewing thru the restraints.

    My growlist: http://www.terraforums.com/forums/sh...255#post961255

    Video of my birth http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Xc5wIpUenQ

  8. #16
    maxima's Avatar
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    Interesting theory Exo, thank you, I will stop using it. I was only spraying lightly on the surface to ward off insects and making sure the soil was dry before doing so; but I may have been careless all the same.
    Thanks for your input.

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