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Thread: Tougher than we think?

  1. #9
    scottychaos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SDCPs View Post
    Anyway, how do you know your situation is the origin of the "fridge method?" Is there some documentaion as to who "invented" it?
    No, I dont think anyone knows who invented it for sure..
    "the fridge method" is probably at least 20 years old..maybe much more..
    (I have been visiting on-line CP forums since 1996, and it was well known by then)
    Someone probably came up with in the 1960's or 1970's I would guess..I dont know if there were very many CP hobbiests before that..

    but when you look at the entire CP hobby, it just seems 95% logical that someone in the northern USA or Canada was the one who invented it..
    because where are the primary concentrations of CP hobbiests? North America and Europe..
    (yes, other places around the world as well, obviously, but probably North America and Europe contain 90% of VFT and Sarracenia growers).

    So who needs the fridge method in those areas?
    Not England, not France, not Japan, not South-east Asia, not Australia, not the Southern US..
    that only leaves..Northern US and Canada!
    so just by the process of elimination, we arrive at the answer..
    I could be wrong..but I doubt it!

    Scot

    ---------- Post added at 05:46 AM ---------- Previous post was at 05:30 AM ----------

    Just out of curiosity, I used google to search for variations of Refrigerator dormancy..
    (you can search by date) Nothing comes up until about the year 2001! which is surprising..
    maybe Google cant find everything, but im pretty sure people were talking about it in the mid-90's..
    I wonder when it was first mentioned in the ICPS journal? that goes back to the 70's..

    Scot

  2. #10

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    Actually Scotty, while your winters are much more brutal than ours, plants CAN still become damaged from a sudden temperature dip ( 40 degree drop in one day - we were at 75 and fell to 36 within the space of 6 hours) whether you're in New York or California, especially when they are actively growing - this is from my own observations from being in the nursery business over here for 18+ years. And yes, I've had them growing everywhere in Calif.- from Long Beach, to the mountains up in Northern Ca. and they are tougher than most plants - the plumerias we had outside had to be brought in, as they were burned where the new growth is, and all of the VFT's I had re potted were also burned where all of the OLD growth is, as I check my plants daily.

  3. #11
    scottychaos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by richs View Post
    Actually Scotty, while your winters are much more brutal than ours, plants CAN still become damaged from a sudden temperature dip ( 40 degree drop in one day - we were at 75 and fell to 36 within the space of 6 hours) whether you're in New York or California, especially when they are actively growing -

    maybe..but I highly doubt 36 degrees will do anything to them..
    a frost yes, could do some damage to new growth, but not 36 degrees..

    We hit 80 yesterday..we will probably hit 35 in a few days..
    but I wont even consider moving my plants from the deck..thats "business as usual" for early spring..the plants wont care, wont phase them at all..

    Scot

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    Yes, but I are your plants out in the open? A direct hit from a hard frost does much more damage than exposure to cold air. Now there seems to be a misunderstanding here - although, my thermometer read 36 degrees, a HARD sugar like coating of ice on the ground denotes a hard frost - my larger groups of Sarracenias with pitcher and flower formation in all stages in the open remained untouched - something I have never experienced in the 20 years of growing carnivores.

  5. #13
    scottychaos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by richs View Post
    Yes, but I are your plants out in the open? A direct hit from a hard frost does much more damage than exposure to cold air. Now there seems to be a misunderstanding here - although, my thermometer read 36 degrees, a HARD sugar like coating of ice on the ground denotes a hard frost - my larger groups of Sarracenias with pitcher and flower formation in all stages in the open remained untouched - something I have never experienced in the 20 years of growing carnivores.
    well..you said 36 degrees..so I was commenting on that.
    but its physically impossible to have frost at 36 degrees.
    the frost must have formed over night when it was *colder* than 36 degrees..
    or..you got some kind of frozen rain or ""graupel" or some flavor of semi-frozen precipitation..which could fall from the sky at 36 degrees..

    But thats completely different than "36 degrees", which by itself is completely harmless, and is what I was referring to..

    Scot

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    That's usually when frost "happens"

  7. #15
    scottychaos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by richs View Post
    That's usually when frost "happens"
    when? at 36 degrees?
    no..never..cant happen, its against the laws of physics.

    The surface the frost forms on has to be below freezing..because water simply wont freeze above 32 degrees!

    So it was either below 32 degrees, for frost to form..
    or..IMO from your description, it sounds more likely to me that you simply got some sort of frozen precipatation from the sky..that is totally plausable and happens all the time..
    it freezes up high, where its much colder, then falls to the ground where the surface air temp can be above freezing, then it slowly melts..

    but for frost..you had to be below 32..cant happen at 36.

    Scot

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    Let's beat that dead horse! You know I'm not a member of NWS Scotty, so I'm sorry my reports won't carry all the nuances of a seasoned forecaster - however, I posted this for people who were interested in the hardiness of these plants when situations that I had spoke of earlier arise, not to start a nit picking contest over what was experienced at what temperature! And I'm done with this..

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